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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for D. Murphy or search for D. Murphy in all documents.

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aise could more than do them justice. Of course, many acts of valor were performed not witnessed by me; but among those I saw Captain Gratz, leading his men against overwhelming odds, and falling in death just as he had repulsed the foe; Lieutenant Murphy dashing forward ahead of the line, waving his sword high in the air, shouting onward to the almost wavering men, who gained fresh courage from the exhibition, and, pushing forward, drove the enemy from the field. In this fight many of our any of their own men, killed and wounded, but covering the ground thick with delegates from the ranks of the retreating foe. Lieut.-Col. Andrews, already wounded, still kept his position, urging the men onward by every argument in his power. Lieut. Murphy, when they once halted, wavering, stepped several paces forward, waving his sword in the air, and called successfully upon his men to follow him. Every captain and lieutenant did his duty nobly, and when they were recalled and replaced by the
aise could more than do them justice. Of course, many acts of valor were performed not witnessed by me; but among those I saw Captain Gratz, leading his men against overwhelming odds, and falling in death just as he had repulsed the foe; Lieutenant Murphy dashing forward ahead of the line, waving his sword high in the air, shouting onward to the almost wavering men, who gained fresh courage from the exhibition, and, pushing forward, drove the enemy from the field. In this fight many of our any of their own men, killed and wounded, but covering the ground thick with delegates from the ranks of the retreating foe. Lieut.-Col. Andrews, already wounded, still kept his position, urging the men onward by every argument in his power. Lieut. Murphy, when they once halted, wavering, stepped several paces forward, waving his sword in the air, and called successfully upon his men to follow him. Every captain and lieutenant did his duty nobly, and when they were recalled and replaced by the