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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 10 2 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 3 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 2 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 25, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Isaac Murphy or search for Isaac Murphy in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 2 document sections:

to the affirmative, so that the vote, as footed up, finally stood 69 to 1. That one vote in the negative was persisted in by the delegate from Madison county, Isaac Murphy, who explained that he had pledged his constituents to oppose secession, which he did not believe was the remedy, as he preferred to fight under the old flag as a rebel. He was a rebel, he said, and would be found fighting to the last in resisting the usurpation of the government. Mr. Murphy, not long before, had come to Arkansas from Indiana, and found an abiding place in the mountainous county of Madison, on the Missouri border. He immediately introduced a resolution authorizing thhe convention represented their principles. The convention, at this juncture of events, devoted its attention to making preparation for the coming struggle. Mr. Murphy's resolution to seize the money of the United States in the hands of receivers of the land districts was carried into effect. The $36,000 paid for arms by the
ederal cavalry now penetrated at will into the region adjacent to Batesville, and into the counties bordering on Missouri, burning homes, carrying off slaves, destroying farming utensils, and leading old men and boys into captivity, or murdering them. Tories formed a Federal Arkansas regiment at Batesville, and a brigade in Madison, Carroll and Newton counties, and induced some leading citizens, former State officials, Lafayette Gregg and others, and a member of the secession convention (Isaac Murphy), to join their standard. Their influence was rapidly growing in the hill lands, extending southward and west of Little Rock. Colonel Jeffers, May 16th, met the enemy at Chalk Bluff, on White river, and resisted the crossing, causing the Federals considerable loss. May 17th, a detachment of Federal Missouri cavalry, guided by a supposed tory named Van Metre, of White county, were foraging on Little Red river when they were attacked by Confederates under Captain Chrisman, who captured