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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Orson S. Murray or search for Orson S. Murray in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 12: American Anti-slavery Society.—1833. (search)
y, in the fifth of Angelina Grimkeas Letters to Catherine Beecher (Lib. 7.123). Pennsylvania, Thomas Shipley, the intrepid foe of slaveholders and kidnappers, Edwin P. Atlee, whose end, like Shipley's and Evan Lewis's, was lamentably near at hand, Thomas Whitson, James Mott, Bartholomew Fussell, and other less known (Hicksite) Friends. But the variety of character and talent gathered together in that upper story would not be comprehended if allusion were not also made to Joshua Coffin, Orson S. Murray, Ray Potter, Simeon S. Jocelyn, Robert B. Hall, Amos A. Phelps, John Rankin, A wealthy and liberal New York merchant, subsequently Treasurer of the American Anti-Slavery Society. Not to be confounded with the author of Rankin's letters (see Life of Arthur Tappan, p. 244). William Green, Jr., Abraham L. Cox, William Goodell, Elizur Wright, Jr., George Bourne, Charles W. Denison, Robert Purvis, and James Miller McKim. On the second day, too, a handful of women, all members of the Soc
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 13: Marriage.—shall the Liberator die?George Thompson.—1834. (search)
ir treatment in Providence. Not a meeting-house could they obtain in that city! Alas! there's none so poor would do them reverence. Even in this city it was with the utmost difficulty they could find a place in which to exhibit those young humbugs, the two African princes, and their emancipation scheme, which is the greatest humbug of all! They could get into no churches but the Methodist—not even into Park Street! Now let them ask, with a sneer, What have abolitionists done? The Rev. Orson S. Murray writes to Mr. Garrison (Ms. Oct. 11, 1834) of Congregational clergymen in Vermont who would no longer take up collections for the Colonization Society. This unfriendly reception of the colonizationists, however, was a sacrifice of real to outward logic. The people of Boston should know no difference between immediate abolition and Colonization, if they are calculated to destroy the harmony which should subsist between the North and the South (Commercial Gazette, in Lib. 4.123.