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of Cavalry, was ordered, November fourteenth, to establish his headquarters, with the First division of cavalry, at or near Alexandria, and employ the division in hunting and exterminating these marauders. Elliott reached Alexandria on the eighteenth, and on the twenty-seventh reports that his scouts met those of Burnside on Hint Ridge, cast of Sparta, and that Lieutenant-Colonel Brownlow, with detachments from the First East-Tennessee and Ninth Pennsylvania cavalry, attacked the rebel Colonel Murray on the twenty-sixth at Sparta, killing one, wounding two, and capturing ten of the enemy, including a lieutenant of Champ Ferguson's; he also captured a few horses and ammunition, and destroyed extensive salt-works used by the rebels. A company of scouts under Captain Brixir also encountered a party of guerrillas near Beersheba Springs, captured fifteen or twenty and dispersed the rest. Brigadier-General R. S. Granger reports from Nashville, November second, that a mixed command, under
d Tracy City on the twentieth, and after having three times summoned the garrison to surrender, were handsomely repulsed by our forces. Colonel T. J. Harrison, Thirty-ninth Indiana, (mounted infantry,) reports from Cedar Grove, twenty-first instant, that he had sent an expedition of two hundred men to Sparta, to look after the guerrillas in that vicinity. They divided into five parties, concentrating at Sparta, having passed over the localities of Carter's, Champ Ferguson's, Bledsoe's, and Murray's guerrillas. His (Harrison's) force remained on the Calf-Killer five days, and during that time killed four, (4,) wounded five or six, and captured fifteen, (15,) including a captain and lieutenant, thirty (30) horses, and twenty stand of arms. The Nashville and Chattanooga Railroad, having been completed on the fourteenth instant, and trains running regularly from Nashville to this point, steps were immediately taken to commence repairing the East-Tennessee and Georgia Railroad. The F
st, about a half-mile in the woods. The Sixteenth army corps, commanded by General A. J. Smith, occupied the right up to the centre, and the Nineteenth army corps, under General Franklin, the left up to the centre. The reserves were posted about a half-mile in the rear. The forces supporting the Sixteenth army corps were the Forty-ninth Illinois, commanded by Major Thomas W. Morgan; One Hundred and Seventy-eighth New-York, commanded by Colonel Waler; Eighty-ninth Indiana, commanded by Colonel Murray, and the Fifty-eighth Illinois. I have no list of the regiments supporting the Nineteenth army corps. The rebels under Kirby Smith attacked our whole front in great force, and after a half-hour of terrible fighting, with musketry and field artillery, our forces fell back on the reserve line, a distance of about a half-mile. The enemy pursued with great rapidity, fighting all the way, and doing considerable damage. For a time all seemed lost, but the presence of the Western troops insp