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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 40 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 23 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 16 0 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 10 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 28, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 2 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for A. Murray or search for A. Murray in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 35: operations of the North Atlantic Squadron, 1863. (search)
did serious injury to them. The vessels were much shattered by shot and falling trees, but by good luck and good management they worked their way out of the net in which they had injudiciously become entangled. Yet these were the services in which both Army and Navy were called upon frequently to embark, where, in nine out of ten times, the loss and capture of the expedition might have been counted upon. Fortunately, in this expedition, only two men were killed and six wounded. Commander Murray says, in his report: This expedition was partially strategic and was very successful. The attack on the batteries and the falling-back of the light boats, the shelling of the woods, and the feint to land a force on the north bank, had the desired effect. [!] What the desired effect was, history does not say, and it seems to the writer that this was simply an expedition where men's lives were sacrificed without any apparent good. The Army was frittering away its forces in these smal