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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for John H. Murray or search for John H. Murray in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
ing themselves The Independent Association of the Maryland Line, and adopted a constitution which provided for organizing the members into companies, regiments and brigades. Nothing further ever came of this movement. The companies of Dorsey, Murray and Robertson were, late in May and early in June, mustered into the Virginia service at Richmond, and then transferred to the First Maryland regiment, which they joined at Winchester, June 16, 1861. As this regiment was marching into the batt the complete arrangements which the committee made and the enthusiastic zeal with which they worked up the lecture. President Davis was invited to preside, but being unable to do so sent the following beautiful letter: Beauvoir, Miss. John H. Murray, Secretary, etc.: Dear Sir,—Accept my thanks for your very kind and complimentary letter of the 21st instant. For many reasons it would be most gratifying to me to be present with you at the proposed meeting on the 27th instant to receiv
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Maryland line in the Confederate Army. (search)
her Marylanders congregated at Leesburg, and on June 6th, 1861, held a meeting, at which five counties and the City of Baltimore were represented, of which Coleman Yellott was President, and Frank A. Bond, Secretary. They formed an association, calling themselves The Independent Association of the Maryland Line, and adopted a constitution which provided for organizing the members into companies, regiments and brigades. Nothing further ever came of this movement. The companies of Dorsey, Murray and Robertson were, late in May and early in June, mustered into the Virginia service at Richmond, and then transferred to the First Maryland regiment, which they joined at Winchester, June 16, 1861. As this regiment was marching into the battle of Manassas, July 21, 1861, Captain Charles Snowden presented to us a flag which had been brought through the lines by Miss Hettie Carey. It was a Maryland State color, with the arms of the State painted on blue silk on the one side, and on the o
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
ing the occasion of his visit a splendid success. Any doubts which we had cherished of the propriety of calling on New Orleans again after their grand meeting and splendid contribution to our funds last spring, were speedily dissipated when we saw the complete arrangements which the committee made and the enthusiastic zeal with which they worked up the lecture. President Davis was invited to preside, but being unable to do so sent the following beautiful letter: Beauvoir, Miss. John H. Murray, Secretary, etc.: Dear Sir,—Accept my thanks for your very kind and complimentary letter of the 21st instant. For many reasons it would be most gratifying to me to be present with you at the proposed meeting on the 27th instant to receive General Fitzhugh Lee. In few things do I feel a more cordial interest than in the success of the Southern Historical Society. It is a sacred duty to collect and preserve the evidence of the magnanimous conduct of our people in the defense of the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
our friends there. A gallant and accomplished soldier, a graceful and eloquent speaker, a genial and popular gentleman, and an enthusiast in his work, General Johnston never fails to make friends for the Society wherever he goes. We hope to be able before long to announce for him a programme which will go far towards ensuring the success of our effort for permanent endowment. A Confederate soldiers' home for Louisiana was organized in New Orleans in April last, and our friend, Private John H. Murray, advised us that he had sent us an account of its organization; but we regret to say that the paper containing it somehow miscarried, and we must ask for a brief sketch of it for future publication. Valentine's Recumbent figure of Lee will be unveiled at Lexington, Va., on the 28th of June, with appropriate ceremonies, a full account of which we hope to give in our next. Meantime we cordially congratulate the Lee Memorial Association on the completion of their labors in the produ
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
Approved June 30, 1882. S. D. McENERY, Governor of the State of Louisiana. A true copy: will A. Strong, Secretary of State. The Board of Directors as at present constituted are: Army of Northern Virginia—Francis T. Nichols, President; John H. Murray, Louis Prados, John J. Fitzpatrick, John W. T. Leech. Treasurer, John H. Murray. Army of Tennessee—J. A. Chalaron, John Augustin, A. J. Lewis, W. H. Rogers, R. Lambert. A. J. Lewis, Secretary. We need scarcely add that under such managemenTreasurer, John H. Murray. Army of Tennessee—J. A. Chalaron, John Augustin, A. J. Lewis, W. H. Rogers, R. Lambert. A. J. Lewis, Secretary. We need scarcely add that under such management the success of the Home is already an assured fact. All honor to our Louisiana Confederates! renewals are always in order, and very much so just at this time. We have on our books a number of names whose time is out, and we need just now their renewal fees. We shall send them a gentle hint, to which we hope they will respond by sending us the $3. And we beg our friends not only to send us their own renewals, but to see to it that their neighbors do the same. Our present subscription <