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H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 94 0 Browse Search
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H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 3: Fortifications.Their importance in the defence of States proved by numerous historical examples (search)
and capture of these places. But Carnot and Napoleon changed this system, at the same time with thst military judges of the present century. Napoleon says of fortifications, they are an excellentduke Charles, as a general, knew no rival but Napoleon, and General Jomini is universally regarded access. Let us now turn to the campaigns of Napoleon. In his first campaign in. Italy, 1796, the But even after the victory of Marengo, says Napoleon, I did not consider the whole of Italy reconq. Profiting by the neglect of the Prussians, Napoleon seized upon the great defensive works of the These Prussian fortresses were retained by Napoleon at the treaty of Tilsit. The campaign of 180ians. Those works which had been given up to Napoleon previous to the opening of hostilities, contre fortresses which had remained faithful; and Napoleon said at St. Helena, that if he had collected is discussed by Ternay, Vauban, Cormontaigne, Napoleon, the Archduke Charles, Jomini, Fallot, and, i[12 more...]
orthy of study. At the beginning of this war Napoleon had to choose between methodical operations, prompt and decisive results than the other. Napoleon, therefore, determined to adopt it for his ace officers who tolerated them, rather than of Napoleon, who punished such breaches of discipline, whcarried with him provisions for fifteen days. Napoleon says, Experience has proved that an army oughty-five miles a day, in the midst of winter. Napoleon transported an army of fifty thousand men froe much less rapid than those of the armies of Napoleon. Nevertheless, for a single day the English the most ground. In the Russian campaign of Napoleon, his cavalry failed to keep pace with the infed them to raise the siege and to retreat. Napoleon estimates that an army of 100,000 men in posiby patrols of cavalry. The manner in which Napoleon quartered and wintered his army on the Passar'oeil, and genius. In relation to this point Napoleon makes the following remarks :-- Ought an[3 more...]
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 5: Tactics.The twelve orders of battle, with examples of each.—Different Formations of infantry, cavalry, artillery, and engineers on the field of battle, with the Modes of bringing troops into action (search)
, under Frederick; the Pyramids, Marengo, and Jena, under Napoleon. (Figure 20.) An army may be perpendicular upon a flane when the attacking force is vastly superior. At Eylau, Napoleon made a perpendicular attack on one wing at the same time as to the perpendicular order on both wings. At Dresden, Napoleon attacked both wings at the same time; this is the only inth the necessary ensemble. At the battle of the Pyramids, Napoleon formed the oblique order in echelon by squares. Portionsof the preceding for attacking a strong contiguous line. Napoleon employed this order at Wagram, Ligny, Bautzen, Borodino, two preceding, has sometimes been employed with success. Napoleon used this formation at Tagliamento, and the Russians at Ed independently of the other. In the wars of the Empire, Napoleon united two or more of these divisions into a corps d'arme dispense. No one knew better the use of this maxim than Napoleon, and no one was a more strict and habitual observer of it
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 6: military Polity—The means of national defence best suited to the character and condition of a country, with a brief account of those adopted by the several European powers. (search)
and supplies by way of Quebec, that country would inevitably have fallen into our possession. In the winter of 1806-7, Napoleon crossed the Vistula, and advanced even to the walls of Konigsberg, with the Austrians in his rear, and the whole power o, she would, in all probability, says the best of military judges, Jomini, have struck a fatal blow to the operations of Napoleon, and his army must have been exceedingly fortunate even to regain the Rhine. But Austria preferred remaining neutral ti into action at the favorable moment, she might, most probably, have decided the fate of Europe. Defensive war, says Napoleon, does not preclude attack, any more than offensive war is exclusive of defence, for frequently the best way to counteracnd the new revolutionary power was fast sinking away before the combined opposition of Europe,when the greatly genius of Napoleon, with a strong arm and iron rule, seizing upon the scattered fragments, and binding them together into one consolidated