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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Discipline in the Confederate States army. (search)
Discipline in the Confederate States army. In fidelity to duty and observance of prescribed regulations, it may be assumed that the Confederate soldier compared favorably with any similarly taxed and ill provided. Generally, he was scarce surpassed in willing attributes by the model followers of the first Napoleon. Dominated by patriotism, his ardor yielded neither to hunger nor nakedness. The following statement contains a just tribute to a gallant and efficient officer—a present honored and useful citizen of Richmond: Richmond, Va., May 29, 1888. In connection with the prevalent idea so often expressed that there was little or no discipline in the Army of Northern Virginia [?], I take pleasure in putting on record what I heard General Harry Heth say of General John R. Cooke's North Carolina brigade, composed of the Fifteenth, Twenty-seventh, Forty-sixth, Forty-eighth and Fifty-fifth North Carolina regiments. We were talking on the subject of discipline of troops
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.35 (search)
ed 9,740 out of 33,000, while their opponents reported their killed and wounded 9,616, making the casualties about thirty per cent. At the great battle of Wagram Napoleon lost but about five per cent. At Wurzburg the French lost but three and a half per cent., and yet the army gave up the field and retreated to the Rhine. At Racollies the same intrepid commander lost but six per cent. At Contras Henry of Navarre was reported as cut to pieces, yet his loss was less than ten per cent. At Lodi Napoleon lost one and one-fourth per cent. At Valmy Frederick lost but three per cent., and at the great battles of Marengo and Austerlitz, sanguinary as they were, NaNapoleon lost an average of less than fourteen and a half per cent. At Magenta and Solferino, in 1859, the average loss of both armies was less than nine per cent. At Koniggratz, in 1866, it was six per cent. At Worth, Specheran, Mars la Tour, Gravelotte and Sedan, in 1870, the average loss was twelve per cent. At Linden General
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.36 (search)
ed 9,740 out of 33,000, while their opponents reported their killed and wounded 9,616, making the casualties about thirty per cent. At the great battle of Wagram Napoleon lost but about five per cent. At Wurzburg the French lost but three and a half per cent., and yet the army gave up the field and retreated to the Rhine. At Racollies the same intrepid commander lost but six per cent. At Contras Henry of Navarre was reported as cut to pieces, yet his loss was less than ten per cent. At Lodi Napoleon lost one and one-fourth per cent. At Valmy Frederick lost but three per cent., and at the great battles of Marengo and Austerlitz, sanguinary as they were, NaNapoleon lost an average of less than fourteen and a half per cent. At Magenta and Solferino, in 1859, the average loss of both armies was less than nine per cent. At Koniggratz, in 1866, it was six per cent. At Worth, Specheran, Mars la Tour, Gravelotte and Sedan, in 1870, the average loss was twelve per cent. At Linden General