hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 18 results in 6 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
undry sides, with divided forces, from different directions, and thus crush him. The lessons of the old Napoleon had not been enough to teach them: this new Virginian Napoleon will, perhaps, illuminate their obtuseness, but with light too sulphurous for their delectation. This old plan, attempted against a wakeful and rapid advere vanquished in the morning. As to the measure of Shield's disaster, it was to be complete; dispersion and capture of his whole force, with all his material. As Napoleon curtly said at the battle of Rivoli, concerning the Austrian division detached around the mountain to beset his rear: Ils sont á nous; so it seems had Jackson d should all have been, ere this, there; not pothering here, in straggling Indian file. Well did I know how Jackson's soul at that hour would avouch that word of Napoleon: Ask me for anything but time. But no: Generals had their orders: to march by the bridge. They would usurp no discretion. Punctilious obedient men they! keep
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Stonewall Jackson. (search)
the other. To cross it there remained now but the one passage, which lay under the muzzles of Jackson's cannon, for all the bridges above and below had been burned. Fremont and Shields would now, therefore, apply the old strategy, which red tape once deemed appropriate for the superior numbers. They would surround Jackson on sundry sides, with divided forces, from different directions, and thus crush him. The lessons of the old Napoleon had not been enough to teach them: this new Virginian Napoleon will, perhaps, illuminate their obtuseness, but with light too sulphurous for their delectation. This old plan, attempted against a wakeful and rapid adversary, capable of striking successive blows, only invites him to divide and conquer. This Jackson will now teach them in his own time, and it shall be lesson number second.. They shall never strike together: nay, Shields shall never strike at all, but be stricken: thus hath the master of the game already decided. Shall Jackson,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Stonewall Jackson. (search)
mach for it, to fight a second pitched battle with his army, more than double the one vanquished in the morning. As to the measure of Shield's disaster, it was to be complete; dispersion and capture of his whole force, with all his material. As Napoleon curtly said at the battle of Rivoli, concerning the Austrian division detached around the mountain to beset his rear: Ils sont á nous; so it seems had Jackson decreed of Shields's men: They belong to us. This the whole disposition of his battl even my inexperienced ear was taught by the cannon thundering at Lewiston, that we should all have been, ere this, there; not pothering here, in straggling Indian file. Well did I know how Jackson's soul at that hour would avouch that word of Napoleon: Ask me for anything but time. But no: Generals had their orders: to march by the bridge. They would usurp no discretion. Punctilious obedient men they! keeping the word of promise to the ears, but breaking it to the sense. Well, in such fa
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Unveiling of Valentine's Recumbent figure of Lee at Lexington, Va., June 28th, 1883. (search)
rave and simple majesty which commanded instant reverence and repressed familiarity; and yet so charmed by a certain modesty and gracious deference, that reverence and confidence were ever ready to kindle into affection. It was impossible to look upon him, and not to recognize at a glance that in him, nature gave assurance of a man created great and good. Mounted in the field, and at the head of his troops, a glimpse of Lee, was an inspiration. His figure was as distinctive as that of Napoleon. Ah! soldiers! who can forget it? The black slouch hat; the cavalry boots; the dark cape; the plain gray coat without an ornament but the three stars on the collar; the calm, victorious face; the splendid, manly figure on the gray warhorse, that steps as if proudly conscious of his rider; he looked every inch the true knight—the grand, invincible champion of a great principle. Mental attributes and attainments. The intellectual abilities of General Lee were of the highest order, and
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Virginia campaign of 1864-1865. (search)
m. The difficulties which confronted General Lee in the winter and spring of 1865 were simply insurmountable. Human skill and courage were not adequate to the task of turning back the tidal wave which was rapidly engulphing the Confederacy. After the defeat of Hood at Nashville and the advance of Sherman into North Carolina, the end was inevitable. No movement within General Lee's reach could have changed the result. It was not possible long to delay the catastrophe. The struggle of Napoleon against the allies in 1814, as he was forced back upon Paris, and finally overwhelmed, is perhaps the best modern parallel to this magnificent campaign, but the efforts of the greatest soldier of any age for his capital and his throne were not more brilliant or tenacious, and were far less protracted, than those of the great Virginian for the government and capital of his native State and of the Confederacy. History contains no finer specimen of the boldness, sagacity and skill with which
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Address of General Dabney H. Maury at the Reunion of Confederate veterans, Maury camp, no. 2, Fredericksburg, Va., August 23, 1883. (search)
ch were the property of the whole human race. In grateful words he declined these tempting honors because he could not abandon his own people in the day of their calamity. When the war closed a price had been set upon his head, and he was a homeless exile. Again Russia and France invited him, and the new born Mexican Empire won him to her service for a time. He was in England when Maximilian fell, and remained there to complete the School Geographies now so widely used. Then once again Napoleon sought him, offering the highest scientific office of France, which he declined, because his own people needed him. And in their service he calmly closed his great career. His last words were, It is well, and well it is with him, indeed. In all his writings, all his works, he had illustrated the Christian's life and confirmed the Christian's faith. In these days of flippant infidelity, when would-be wise men question the revelations of the Scriptures through their developments of modern