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Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 378 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 106 0 Browse Search
Emil Schalk, A. O., The Art of War written expressly for and dedicated to the U.S. Volunteer Army. 104 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 19, 1864., [Electronic resource] 66 0 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 46 0 Browse Search
John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War. 36 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 32 0 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 28 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 26 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Napoleon or search for Napoleon in all documents.

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terrific, and the anxiety the most intense, there came from the rear of our ranks a sound which seemed for the moment to subdue the roar even of the artillery. All eyes and ears were turned to discover its origin, which proved to be the approach of Gen. McClellan and staff. Throughout the day he had been momentarily expected, and his opportune coming was hailed with long and enthusiastic cheering. Regiment after regiment, as he was quickly recognised, gave utterance to a welcome of which Napoleon might have been proud. Arriving at headquarters, he โ€” without dismounting from his horse โ€” held a brief consultation with Gen. Keyes, and approving his course, and especially his order for reenforcements to Gen. Hancock, joined him in a ride throughout our lines. His appearance was everywhere the signal for an outburst of the wildest applause. He wore a plain blue coat, and had his cap enveloped in a glazed covering. The rapidity of his ride to the field had well spattered him with mud,
and somewhat later he was again ordered to fall back. Gen. McClellan, who had remained at headquarters to communicate with General Porter and our left wing, now appeared upon the field, and ordered the reoccupation of the conquered territory. Birney's brigade had already returned to camp, and Grover and Sickles's were resting on our side of the timber, having left a powerful picket in front. Part of Couch's division was sent forward, and a section of De Russy's battery, consisting of two Napoleon guns, was advanced. During the afternoon one ineffectual effort was made by the enemy to recover lost ground, and a desultory picket-firing and considerable sharp-shooting was going on all along the line. The battery was vigorously worked, and the rifle-pits were soon cleaned out. An hour before sunset, a strong force of the enemy suddenly appeared on the left of Hooker, and sharply attacked Robinson's brigade, but they were soon driven back, with mutual loss. At sunset the day was ours,
this battle were numerous and of very superior workmanship. The twenty-six pieces were most beautiful, while immense piles of guns could be seen on every hand, many scarcely having the manufacturer's finish even tarnished. The enemy seemed quite willing to throw them away on the slightest pretext, dozens being found with loads still undischarged. The number of small arms captured was not less than fifteen thousand, of every calibre and every make. The field-pieces taken were principally Napoleon, Parrott and Blakely (English) guns. We have captured large quantities of army-wagons, tents, equipments, shoes. Clothing in abundance was scattered about, and immense piles of new uniforms were found untouched. Every conceivable article of clothing was found in these divisional camps, and came quite apropos to our needy soldiery, scores of whom took a cool bath, and changed old for new under-clothing, many articles being of costly material and quite unique. The amount of ammunition fou
ess places Lee at the side of the greatest captains, Hannibal, Caesar, Eugene, Napoleon. I hope you have preserved my letters in which I have spoken of my faith in Lee. He and his round-table of generals are worthy the immortality of Napoleon and his Marshals. He moves his agencies like a god--secret, complicated, vast, resistlel of 1857, variously called the gun-howitzer, the light twelve-pounder, or the Napoleon. Third. That each field-battery should, if practicable, be composed of sixsilence was ominous of no good. One rifled six-pounder and one twelve-pounder Napoleon remained posted at the bridge to guard it and prevent an approach from Sandy HLieutenant Watson commanding--one twelve-pounder heavy gun, one twelve-pounder Napoleon, one twelve-pounder howitzer, and one three-inch rifled gun, under Lieut. Masoom the position during the rest of the day. It being evident that the Young Napoleon, finding he could not force his way through the invincible ranks of our army i
e great operations โ€” to have helped, even so little, to consummate the grand plan, whose history will be a text-book to all young soldiers, arid whose magnificent success places Lee at the side of the greatest captains, Hannibal, Caesar, Eugene, Napoleon. I hope you have preserved my letters in which I have spoken of my faith in Lee. He and his round-table of generals are worthy the immortality of Napoleon and his Marshals. He moves his agencies like a god--secret, complicated, vast, resistlesNapoleon and his Marshals. He moves his agencies like a god--secret, complicated, vast, resistless, complete. Richmond Examiner account. Richmond, September 3, 1862. Passengers by the Central Railroad, now almost our only source of information from our armies at Manassas, brought down with them yesterday evening no well-authenticated intelligence from the great battle of last Saturday. At the time of their leaving Gordonsville it had been telegraphed thither from Rapidan station that participants in the battle had arrived at the latter place, bringing intelligence of the death
en; to be expanded, if possible, to three pieces to one thousand men. Second. That the proportion of rifle-guns should be one third, and of smooth-bores, two thirds. That the rifle-guns should be restricted to the systems of the United States Ordnance Department; and of Parrott and the smooth-bores, (with the exception of รก few howitzers for special service,) to be exclusively the twelve-pound gun of the model of 1857, variously called the gun-howitzer, the light twelve-pounder, or the Napoleon. Third. That each field-battery should, if practicable, be composed of six guns, and none to be less than four guns, and in all cases the guns of each battery should be of uniform calibre. Fourth. That the field-batteries were to be assigned to divisions, and not to brigades, and in the proportion of four to each division, of which one was to be a battery of regulars, the remainder of volunteers. The captain of the regular battery to be the commandant of artillery of the division.
used them to skedaddle in quick time. Every body retired that night, feeling that all was lost unless reenforcements arrived, and expected to be awoke on the morrow with the booming of artillery from the evacuated heights. The battle of Sunday, September 14. Morning came, but with it no signs of the enemy, (except in front.) Our guns and camps on the mountains remained just as we had left them, and yet the silence was ominous of no good. One rifled six-pounder and one twelve-pounder Napoleon remained posted at the bridge to guard it and prevent an approach from Sandy Hook below. The First Maryland home brigade took position near the pontoon-bridge, to destroy it should the enemy attempt to make a crossing, while a portion of the Eighty-seventh Ohio were so posted as to guard the approach from Winchester. Four twenty-pound Parrotts, three twenty-four howitzers, and several twelve and six-pounders were planted in the graveyard, half-way up the hill, and behind the first line of
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 121.-surrender of Munfordville, Ky. (search)
the ranking officer, assumed command, and will, no doubt, make a report of the events occurring on Monday and Tuesday following the Sunday's fight. My whole force consisted of the Sixty-seventh and Eighty-ninth Indiana regiments, one company of the Eighteenth regulars, two hundred and four recruits of the Seventeenth Indiana, two companies Seventy-fourth Indiana, one company of cavalry, Louisville Provost Guard, Lieutenant Watson commanding--one twelve-pounder heavy gun, one twelve-pounder Napoleon, one twelve-pounder howitzer, and one three-inch rifled gun, under Lieut. Mason; Thirteenth Indiana battery, sixty men; Thirty-third Kentucky, Capt. Wilson--the whole force amounting to two thousand one hundred and twenty-two men for duty. If I were to give a list of those who did their whole duty, it would simply be a muster-roll of all who were there; no man flinched or held back a particle. I must, however, mention W. A. Bullitt, Adjutant Third Kentucky, who conveyed orders for me thro
sissippi, who had command of Gen. Jackson's division, galloped to the front of his brigade, and seizing the standard, rallied them forward. No sooner did the gallant General thus throw himself in the van than four bullets pierced his body, and he fell dead amidst his men. The effect, instead of discouraging, fired them with determination and revenge, and they dashed forward, drove the enemy back, and kept them from the position during the rest of the day. It being evident that the Young Napoleon, finding he could not force his way through the invincible ranks of our army in that direction, had determined upon a flank movement towards Harper's Ferry, and thus obtain a position in our rear. General Lee, with steady foresight, anticipated the movement by drawing the main body of his army back on the south side of the Potomac, at Shepherdstown, Va., whence he will, of course, project the necessary combinations for again defeating his adversary. The enemy's artillery was served with
ances. The ground to the right of this road being rough and rugged, prevented the train being taken off the road and parked. I previously stated that the firing on both sides ceased at dark. The enemy posted their pickets about fifty yards from ours, but the main body escaped during the night, and with such precipitation that they left their dead and wounded, and could not carry the guns captured from the new batteries from the field. The guns were all secured next morning, except two Napoleon guns of Parson's battery, that were kindly exchanged by the enemy for two six-pound field-guns. The enemy retreated across Chaplin River to the Harrodsburgh turnpike, about one half-mile distant from the battle-field, thence to Harrods-burgh. The battle-field was a chosen one of the enemy. They marched from Harrodsburgh to give our army battle, at or near Perryville. The ground upon which the battle was fought was very much broken by hills and deep ravines, which offered every facil