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Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 378 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 106 0 Browse Search
Emil Schalk, A. O., The Art of War written expressly for and dedicated to the U.S. Volunteer Army. 104 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 19, 1864., [Electronic resource] 66 0 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 46 0 Browse Search
John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War. 36 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 32 0 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 28 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 26 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Napoleon or search for Napoleon in all documents.

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a State troops and other fragmentary bodies, held the right. Bragg's headquarters, a small house on Mission Ridge, in a south-east direction, was plainly visible, and served as a mark for many an ambitious artillerist that day. Singularly enough, too, as if to attract special attention, the enemy's largest cannon were placed in battery near this house. Let us glance around now, and see who occupy this little knob from which we are gazing upon the animated scene we have described. Since Napoleon stood in the midst of his marshals, on that eventful morning when the sun of Austerlitz broke from behind the eastern walls of the world, scarcely had a more distinguished group of personages been collected together than that which I there beheld. There was General Smith, Chief of the Engineer Department, a useful, industrious, scientific man, concealing, under a somewhat repellent exterior, a generous, kindly nature. There was Hunter, without command, but assisting by counsel — Hunter,
d by unlooked — for contingencies. General Meade broke up his quarters at Taneytown, as he states, at eleven P. M. on Wednesday, and reached Gettysburgh at one A. M. Thursday, July second. Early in the morning he set to work examining the position of the various army corps. It is hardly true to say that he imitated the example of all prudent commanders on the eve of a battle, and made a complete survey of the ground he occupied. It was on these occasions that the genius of the First Napoleon revealed itself; for at a glance he saw the advantages of his own position and the assailable point of the enemy. It seems that General Lee was somewhat more astute than Meade in this; for in his report he states what he deemed the most favorable point for his attack. In front of General Longstreet, (opposite our left wing,) Lee remarks, the enemy held a position from which, if he could be driven, it was thought our army could be used to advantage in assailing the more elevated ground bey
ces and occupies the Southern country. It is almost impossible to lay down rules, and I invariably leave this whole subject to the local commanders, but am willing to give them the benefit of my acquired knowledge and experience. In Europe, whence we derive our principles of war, as developed by their histories, wars are between kings or rulers, through hired armies, and not between peoples. These remain, as it were, neutral, and sell their produce to whatever army is in possession. Napoleon, when at war with Prussia, Austria, and Russia, bought forage and provisions of the inhabitants, and consequently had an interest to protect farms and factories which ministered to his wants. In like manner, the allied armies in France could buy of the French inhabitants whatever they needed, the produce of the soil or manufactures of the country. Therefore, the rule was and is, that wars are confined to the armies, and should not visit the homes of families or private interests. But,
eral Banks's spring campaign is political as well as military. The importance of the South-West may be properly estimated when we consider our relations with Mexico, and the embarrassments occasioned by the French interference with that republic. The occupation of Brownsville, on the Rio Grande, by General Banks, last year, did much toward checking the designs of the French Emperor. An American army was placed on the frontier of the newmade dependency, and any diplomacy between Davis and Napoleon was thus shattered and silenced. That occupation was merely a check. To make it a checkmate, the capture of Shreveport was necessary. This town occupies a point in the extreme north-western part of Louisiana, near the boundary line of Arkansas and Texas. At the head of steamboat navigation on the Red River, in the midst of the largest and richest cotton district in the trans-Mississippi department, the rebel capital of Louisiana, the headquarters of Kirby Smith, and the depot of supplie