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George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 32 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 30, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 6, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 2, April, 1903 - January, 1904 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 29, 1861., [Electronic resource] 3 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 2 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 2 0 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Arkansas troops in the battle of Wilson's Creek. (search)
came to me from General McCulloch, and Captain Greene from General Price, urging me to move at once to their assistance. General Lyon was in possession of Oak Hill; his lines were forward, his batteries aggressive, and his charges impetuous. The fortunes of the day were balanced in the scale, and something must be done or the battle was lost. My men were eager to go forward, and when I led the 3d Arkansas Infantry (Colonel Gratiot) and the right wing of the 5th Arkansas Infantry (Lieutenant-Colonel Neal) across the creek, and pushed rapidly up the hill in the face of the enemy, loud cheers went up from our expectant friends that betokened an enthusiasm which, no doubt, helped to win the fight. Colonel McIntosh, with two pieces of Reid's battery, and with a part of Dockery's 5th Arkansas Infantry, supported my right; the Federal forces occupied two lines of battle, reaching across the crest of Oak Hill; and at this juncture our troops in front were composed of the Missouri forces,
ck for the ground, leaving the unarmed and teams to come up at their leisure. After going some 4 miles we came up with the enemy. I gave orders to Lieut. R. S. Chambers, of Second Ohio Regiment, to take some men and deploy on the right of the road as skirmishers. We steadily drove them ahead for some time, when they were heavily re-enforced, and a cessation of firing from both sides took place. I then took up as good a position as I could in the road and along the fence, assisted by Adjutant Neal, Eighteenth; Lieutenant Leonard, Second; Lieutenant Pryor, Twenty-first, and Lieutenant Dyal, of Second Ohio, still keeping Lieutenant Chambers with his squad deployed as skirmishers. I soon found that the enemy was flanking me on both sides with large numbers of cavalry, and opened fire upon them, which they briskly returned, and the balls fell thick and fast among us, but all seemed perfectly cool, and both officers and men exhibited personal bravery which was hardly to be expected fr
s, Gen. Charles, wounded, 145; 148. Dister, Lt.-Col., killed near Vicksburg, 290. Dix, Major-Gen. John A.. his proclamation on occupying parts of Virginia, 241. Dobbins, Gen., at Big creek, 554-5. Dodge, Gen., his raid in North Alabama, 285. Donaldsonville, La., 102; fights at, 338. Doubleday, Gen. A., succeeds General Hatch (wounded) at South Mountain, 198; opens his batteries at Antietam, 205; at Gettysburg, 880 to 887. Douglas, Col., killed at Antietam, 210. Dow, Gen. Neal, wounded at Port Hudson, 333. Draft, the Democratic press on, 501; riots in New York, because of, 503; Gov. Seymour on, 507. Drewry's Bluff, attack on batteries at, 140-1. Dudley, Gen., defeated at Donaldsonville, 338. Duffield, Brig.-Gen., taken prisoner, 212. Duncan, Gen. J. R., in command at Forts Jackson and St. Philip, La., 87; 90. Dupont, rear-Admiral Samuel F., preparations for attacking Fort Sumter, 466; his iron-clads assail Fort Sumter, 467; their advance arres
brigade of Missourians, while gallantly charging upon the enemy. His place will not be easily filled. Generals Slack and Clark of Missouri were severely wounded--Gen. Price slightly. Capt. Hinson of the Louisiana regiment, Capt. McAlexander of Churchill's regiment, Captains Bell and Brown of Pearce's brigade, Lieuts. Walton and Weaver--all fell while nobly and gallantly doing their duty. Col. McIntosh was slightly wounded by a grape-shot, while charging with the Louisiana regiment--Lieut.-Col. Neal, Major H. Ward, Captains King, Pearson, Gibbs, Ramsaur, Porter, Lieutenants Dawson, Chambers, Johnson, King, Adams, Hardista, McIvor, and Saddler, were wounded while at the head of their companies. Where all were doing their duty so gallantly, it is almost unfair to discriminate. I must, however, bring to your notice, the gallant conduct of the Missouri Generals — McBride, Parsons, Clark, Black, and their officers. To Gen. Price, I am under many obligations for assistance on the ba
brigade of Missourians, while gallantly charging upon the enemy. His place will not be easily filled. Generals Slack and Clark of Missouri were severely wounded--Gen. Price slightly. Capt. Hinson of the Louisiana regiment, Capt. McAlexander of Churchill's regiment, Captains Bell and Brown of Pearce's brigade, Lieuts. Walton and Weaver--all fell while nobly and gallantly doing their duty. Col. McIntosh was slightly wounded by a grape-shot, while charging with the Louisiana regiment--Lieut.-Col. Neal, Major H. Ward, Captains King, Pearson, Gibbs, Ramsaur, Porter, Lieutenants Dawson, Chambers, Johnson, King, Adams, Hardista, McIvor, and Saddler, were wounded while at the head of their companies. Where all were doing their duty so gallantly, it is almost unfair to discriminate. I must, however, bring to your notice, the gallant conduct of the Missouri Generals — McBride, Parsons, Clark, Black, and their officers. To Gen. Price, I am under many obligations for assistance on the ba
on was one killed and twenty-two wounded. The regiments of my brigade were commanded as follows, viz.: First Tennessee, Colonel Turney; Seventh Tennessee, Major Sheppard; Fourteenth Tennessee, Lieutenant-Colonel Lockhart; Nineteenth Georgia, Major Neal; and Fifth Alabama battalion, Captain Hooper. Sharpsburg, 17TH September. The next morning, after the capture of Harper's Ferry, being too unwell for duty, I turned over the command of the brigade to Colonel Turney, First Tennessee, unde the troops upon the enemy. The regiments of the brigade were commanded as follows: First Tennessee, Colonel Turney; Seventh Tennessee, Lieutenant Howard, Adjutant; Fourteenth Tennessee, Lieutenant-Colonel Lockhart, and Nineteenth Georgia by Major Neal. Shepherdstown, 22D September. I resumed command of my brigade the evening of the nineteenth of September. On the morning of the twentieth the division moved down to repel the enemy, who were crossing the Potomac at the Shepherdstown Fe
of matching her progress in life and the development of her accomplishments. . . . I enclose with this a letter from Stanton and my reply, which I want you to preserve very carefully with my other archives, as it may be important. . . . July 13, Sunday, 7.45 A. M. I have ordered all labor suspended to-day to give the men a chance to think of all they have gone through. We are to have service to-day by the chaplain of Gregg's regiment Penn. cavalry. Next Sunday I think I will invite Mr. Neal to preach for us, provided there is any attendance to-day. I enclose this in an envelope with some letters I send you; one from Bishop McIlvaine, which will gratify you, I know; another from some poor fellow in Indiana who has named his child after me. If you choose to send out some little present to it, well and good. 1.30 P. M. . . . Had service this morning by the chaplain of Gregg's regiment, the Rev. Mr. Egan, an Episcopal clergyman of Philadelphia. . . . There never was such
mmunication during active operations with their corps and division commanders. It was the Union Signal Corps with its deceptive flags that enabled General Warren to hold alone the strangely neglected eminence of Little Round Top, the key to the Federal left, until troops could be sent to occupy it. Headquarters, Confederate Signal Corps at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania Signal Corps officers, headquarters army of the Potomac, October, 1863 Standing are Lieutenant F. E. Beardsley, Lieutenant Neal. Lieutenant George J. Clarke, [unknown]. and General (then Captain) Charles L. Davis (leaning on peach-tree). Seated are Captain Charles J. Clarke, Lieutenant W. S. Stryker, and Lieutenant A. B. Capron (afterwards Member of Congress). temporary command, at once, and was forwarded by him to Sheridan at midnight. The importance of this information is apparent, yet Early took the Union army completely by surprise three days later, at daybreak of October 19th, although the tide of morning
lers are fluted, and may be adjusted to break the stone to any required size. From the rollers they pass to a revolving griddle, which separates those of the proper size. Those which are too large are raised by an elevator to be again passed through the machine. Rolls weighing 10 cwt. each will, it is said, crush 1,800 tons of granite before being worn out; and it is claimed that the work is performed in England at one fifth the cost of doing the same by hand. The stone-grinding mill of Neal is designed for pulverizing stone. See also ore-mill. Mace. 1. (Weapon.) A mallet, hammer, or slung-shot used in the Middle Ages to oppose warriors in armor. It had many forms: a simple iron club; a spiked club; a pointed hammer; an iron-spiked ball chained to a handle about 2 feet long. The latter were called morning stars by the train-bands of London; a grim pleasantry. The Assyrian soldiers used wooden clubs knotted with iron. — Herodotus, VII. 63. The bent maces (lissan)
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865, Roster of the Fifty-Fourth Massachusetts Infantry. (search)
iman, George F. Sergt. 22, sin.; farmer; W. Chester, Pa. 4 Mch 63; died of wound 1 Aug 63 Gen. Hos. Beaufort, S. C. Wounded 16 Jly 63 James Id. S. C. $50. Miller, John 25, sin.; barber; Philadelphia. 21 Feb 63; 20 Aug 65. $50. more, Edward 36, mar.; laborer; Sheffield. 7 Dec 63; 20 Aug 65. $325. Sheffield, Mass. Morris, George Corpl 22, mar.; seaman; Philadelphia. 3 Mch 63; 20 Aug 65. Wounded and pris. 20 Feb 64 Olustee, Fla.; Ex. 4 Mch 65 Goldsboro. N C.; ret. 7 Je 65. $50. Neal, Samuel 24, mar.; farmer; Philadelphia. 25 Feb 63; 20 Aug 65. Wounded 18 Jly 63 Ft Wagner. $50. Newport, Erastus 32, mar.; farmer; Monson. 7 Dec 63; 20 Aug 65. $325. Nicholas, Lemuel A. 24, mar.; shoemaker; Philadelphia. 21 Mch 63; 20 Aug 65. $50. Died —— New York. Parker, Jeremiah 21, mar.; farmer; W. Chester Pa. 9 Mch 63; 20 Aug 65. Wounded 20 Feb 64 Olustee, Fla. $50. Parker, John 23, sin.; teamster; Philadelphia. 21 Mch 63; 20 Aug 65. $50. Peer, John W. 21, sin.; barber;
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