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Doc. 86.-the fight at Barboursville, Va. July 12, 1861. The correspondent of the Cincinnati Commercial, accompanying Gen. Cox's division on the Kanawha, gives the following account of the taking possession of Barboursville, and the driving out of the secession troops by a portion of Col. Woodruff's regiment. At midnight on the night of the 12th inst., Col. Woodruff's companies A, B, D, F, and K were aroused from their slumbers, and placed under the command of Lieut.-Col. Neff, and, with one day's rations in their haversacks, they proceeded on their march — after a short but stirring address from Col. Woodruff. The column was conducted by a strong Union man, a resident of Barboursville, who had been driven thence some weeks since. It was proposed to make the attack at early daylight, but the deep silence observed along the route, together with the halts to send forward scouting parties, deferred their coming into sight of the enemy until the sun was two hours high. When th
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 99.-battle of Scarytown, Va. Fought July 17 (search)
; but before it started a second messenger arrived, saying that the enemy had broken, and was flying before our bayonets. This information was false. The order to break ranks was then given, after which Col. Woodruff, Col. De Villiers, Lieutenant-Colonel Neff, and Captains Sloan and Hurd left the camp to see the retreat. They rode three miles beyond the camp, being one mile beyond our pickets, and mistaking the enemy, who, it would seem, had been pursuing the retreating regiments, for our trered, which places our loss at 57, as follows: killed, 9; wounded, 38; missing, 9. The loss of the enemy must have been fully equal to our own. The greatest misfortune of the day, however, was the loss of Col. Woodruff, Col. De Villiers, Lieut.-Col. Neff, and Captains Austin and Hurd. The Second Kentucky regiment, especially, is disconsolate at the loss of their gallant leader, whom they loved as a father. They would storm Gibraltar now to be with him. These officers, as I advised you by t