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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 1 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 1 1 Browse Search
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General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter28: Gettysburg-Third day. (search)
, Col. R. Byrnes; 63d N. Y. (2 cos.), Lieut.-Col. Richard C. Bentley, Capt. Thomas Touhy; 69th N. Y. (2 cos.), Capt. Richard Moroney, Lieut. James J. Smith; 88th N. Y. (2 cos.), Capt. Denis F. Burke; 116th Pa. (4 cos.), Maj. St. Clair A. Mulholland. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Samuel K. Zook, Lieut.-Col. John Fraser; 52d N. Y., Lieut.-Col. C. G. Freudenberg, Capt. William Scherrer; 57th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Alford B. Chapman; 66th N. Y., Col. Orlando H. Morris, Lieut.-Col. John S. Hammell, Maj. Peter Nelson ; 140th Pa., Col. Richard P. Roberts, Lieut.- Col. John Fraser. Fourth Brigade, Col. John R. Brooke; 27th Conn. (2 cos.), Lieut.-Col. Henry C. Merwin, Maj. James H. Coburn; 2d Del., Col. William P. Baily, Capt. Charles H. Christman; 64th N. Y., Col. Daniel G. Bingham, Maj. Leman W. Bradley; 53d Pa., Lieut.-Col. Richards McMichael; 145th Pa. (7 cos.), Col. Hiram L. Brown, Capt. John W. Reynolds, Capt. Moses W. Oliver. Second division, Brig.-Gen. John Gibbon, Brig.-Gen. William Har-r
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces at Gettysburg, Pa., July 1st-3d, 1863. (search)
ey (w), Capt. Thomas Touhy; 69th N. Y. (2 co's), Capt. Richard Moroney (w), Lieut. James J. Smith; 88th N. Y. (2 co's), Capt. Denis F. Burke; 116th Pa. (4 co's), Maj. St. Clair A. Mulholland. Brigadeloss: k, 27; w, 109; m, 62 = 198. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Samuel K. Zook (k), Lieut.-Col. John Fraser: 52d N. Y., Lieut.-Col. C. G. Freudenberg (w), Capt. William Scherrer; 57th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Alford B. Chapman; 66th N. Y., Col. Orlando H. Morris (w), Lieut.-Col. John S. Hammell (w), Maj. Peter Nelson; 140th Pa., Col. Richard P. Roberts (k), Lieut.-Col. John Fraser. Brigade loss: k, 49; w, 227; m, 82 = 358. Fourth Brigade, Col. John R. Brooke (w): 27th Conn. (2 co's), Lieut.-Col. Henry C. Merwin (k), Maj. James H. Coburn; 2d Del., Col. William P. Baily, Capt. Charles H. Christman; 64th N. Y., Col. Daniel G. Binghaml (w), Maj. Leman W. Bradley; 53d Pa., Lieut.-Col. Richards McMichael; 145th Pa. (7 co's), Col. Hiram L. Brown (w), Capt. John W. Reynolds (w), Capt. Moses W. Oliver. Br
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.18 (search)
he schools of Rev. Archibald Campbell and Thomas Martin (the latter of whom prepared James Madison for Princeton College) in Richmond county; of Rev. James Maury, in Orange (the preceptor of Jefferson and many eminent Virginians); of Donald Robertson, of King and Queen. Virginia Schools, etc. I may add Rev. William Douglas, who taught in Goochland and Albemarle counties, and said to have been an early preceptor of Jefferson, and the classical school at Wingfield, in Hanover county; of Rev. Peter Nelson, an alumnus of William and Mary College, who died a minister of the Baptist Church. Many eminent men of Virginia and the Southern States were educated by him. In 1751 a labor school was established in Talbott county, Md., chiefly by the contributions of Virginians, and in which were fed, clothed, lodged, and taught poor children. The providence of the parish system is indicated in the appointed duty of the vestrymen in binding out pauper children, to require by contract that they sho
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.60 (search)
trying to dodge shot, or shell, or minnie. Every one of these strikes just where the Lord permits it to strike, and nowhere else, and you are perfectly safe where the missiles of death fly thickest until Jehovah permits you to be stricken. Major Nelson, of General Ewell's staff, one of the bravest of the brave, and an humble Christian and devout churchman, heard that sermon, and did not fully endorse what he called its extreme Calvinism. During the battle of Malvern Hill General Jackson raff and told them to dismount and shelter themselves. Dr. Dabney chanced to be near a very large, thick oak gate-post, and he very wisely got behind that, sitting bolt upright with his back against it. Soon after he had assumed this position Major Nelson rode up to bring some message from General Ewell to General Jackson, and with a soldier's keen eye at once took in the situation. Delivering his message, he at once rode straight to Dr. Dabney, and, with a graceful military salute, said: Majo