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Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 75 11 Browse Search
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 67 5 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 49 1 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 34 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 27 9 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 26 2 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 24 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 23, 1862., [Electronic resource] 22 2 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 18 0 Browse Search
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 18 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: April 13, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Nelson or search for Nelson in all documents.

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ed our love of country by desiring to protect the great commercial interests of the people. In conclusion, Mr. S. briefly expressed his objections to Mr. Wise's amendment. Mr.Wise, in reply, criticized the position which Mr. Summers was assuming when the expiration of his allotted time compelled him to stop — namely, that the people of Virginia were not to be entitled to representation upon the three-fifths principle in the proposed Congress of States. He then quoted the example of Gen. Nelson, who sighted the gun which drove a ball through his own castle at Yorktown, and told the gentleman from Kanawha that when the interests of his country required it, true patriotism dictated that he, too, should send a ball through his castle; he ought to consent to the destruction of his interests, if such a course would save the honor of his State. The vote was taken, and Mr. Wise's amendment was defeated, as follows: Yeas.--Messrs. Ambler, Jas. Barbour, Blakey, Boisseau, Borst,
The Duplicity of Lincoln. It will be remembered that Messrs. Nelson and Maynard, two patriotic representatives in Congress from Tennessee, were officially assured by Mr. Lincoln that he was opposed to coercive measures, that he was in favor of conciliating the South, and of suspending the collection of the revenues in the seceding States. Perhaps the Virginia Commissioners will be able to inform us how all this can be executed with the large fleet and army sent Southward, except upon a suuld not be good breading to ask him what he means till he has knocked you down. In conformity with which newly invented code of etiquette, we shall refrain from asserting that the official assurances of peace which Lincoln, Seward & Co., gave to Nelson, Maynard, and everybody else, were downright falsehoods, deliberately intended to throw the Southern people off their guard to their destruction. But certainly, under permission of the gentlemen of the Convention, we can't help thinking that, ou