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Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 18 8 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 7 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 4 0 Browse Search
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Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 5: life at camp Benton. (search)
ement in drill made by the regiment under your command, as exhibited at the review of yesterday. So much progress in so short a time gives promise of admirable results and reflects great credit upon both instructors and instructed. Very respectfully, Your obedient servant, Chas. Stewart, A. A. G. At this time there were six Harvard men in the regiment,— Maj. Henry Jackson Howe, '59; Asst. Surg. Josiah Newell Willard, '57; Capt. George Wellington Batchelder, '59; Sergt. Maj. Edgar Marshall Newcomb,‘60; First Lieut. John Hodges,. Jr., ‘61 and Charles Brooks Brown, '56. It was not an infrequent occurrence for the regimental band to include among its selections the delightful melody of Fair Harvard in their honor. The chief thing of interest, beside work, at Poolesville seemed to be to stockade the tents and to build a fire-place which would not smoke the occupants out. Capt. Rice constructed one where the fire was to be in a hole in the ground, the smoke to be carried<
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 15: the rest at Harrison's Landing. (search)
ntil such time as the Governors of the several states shall grant them full commissions, I have the pleasure of sending forward the following names— Sergt. Maj. Edgar M. Newcomb, who fearlessly exposed himself to rally the ranks broken by the tremendous volleys the regiment had to encounter in the fight at Nelson's Farm, to be nd Lieut. Samuel S. Prime, to be First Lieutenant, vice Hale, promoted. Second Lieut. Oliver F. Briggs, to be First Lieutenant, vice Lee, killed. Sergt. Maj. Edgar M. Newcomb, to be Second Lieutenant, vice Palmer, promoted. First Sergt. Frederick Crofts, Company B, to be Second Lieutenant, vice Briggs, promoted. Sergto Company C, as Second Lieutenant, Samuel S. Prime being promoted from Second to First Lieutenant Lieut. Crofts was soon transferred to Company I, and Second Lieut. Edgar M. Newcomb was transferred from Company B to Company K, being promoted from Sergeant Major. First Lieut. Henry A. Hale was promoted to Captain and assigned to Co
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 18: the battle of Antietam. (search)
was always an example in courage, endurance, good nature and gentlemanly deportment. Probaby no commander was more loved when living or sincerely mourned when dead by his men than was Capt. Geo. W. Bachelder. Colonel Devereux says of him: What a noble life went out in his country's cause when he died. Small in stature, but how grand a man! He was beloved not only by the men of his own company, but by everyone in the regiment. The command of Company C then devolved upon Second Lieut. Edgar M. Newcomb, who was soon promoted to be First Lieutenant for his bravery in this action. Capt. Henry A. Hale, Lieut. Albert Thorndike, Lieut. John P. Reynolds, Jr. and Lieut. Elisha A. Hinks were wounded. At an early part of the fight Lieut. Reynolds was wounded in the ankle and was ordered to the rear by Lieut. Col. Devereux. He hobbled back to his company, however, and stayed long enough to receive another wound, this time in the elbow of his sword arm. Col. Devereux said later, joki
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 19: at Bolivar Heights. (search)
utant, vice John C. Chadwick, promoted to Captain of Company C in place of Capt. Bachelder killed in action. First Lieut. Oliver F. Briggs, of Company K, was made Regimental Quartermaster, vice Shaw discharged. First Lieut. Isaac H. Boyd was in command of Company A; Capt. Hale and First Lieut. Reynolds, of Company G were absent on account of wounds, and Second Lieut. Thomas Claffey was in command. Company C had John C. Chadwick, formerly Adjutant of the regiment as Captain, and Edgar M. Newcomb as First Lieutenant. In Company E First Lieut. Elisha A. Hinks who had been transferred from Company B, was absent from wounds. Capt. James H. Rice, of Company F, who had been promoted from First Lieutenant, vice Edmund Rice, promoted to Major, was absent from wounds, and the command of Company F was in the hands of First Lieut. William H. Hill, who had been promoted from Second Lieutenant, vice Chadwick promoted. Capt. James D. Russell, of Company G, who had been transferred f
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 20: to Falmouth, in pursuit of Lee. Burnside supersedes McClellan. (search)
morning until dress parade to ourselves. I wish I was home to enjoy it. My dinner is composed of salt pork, turkey and hard tack. I have made this my washing day, having been to the stream and washed my clothes. The men had not been paid for five months and were very short of money and tobacco. There were two inches of snow on the ground. Before December came, however, the regiment was properly clothed and rationed. The following extract from a letter written by First Lieut. Edgar M. Newcomb describes the surrounding country adequately: November 27, 1862: Procured a pass to Falmouth, and at 9 A. M. started for the village, a mile distant. A neighboring height diverted me, and I ascended to find a battery of six Parrots commanding the town, the river and the country beyond. Following the ridge of hills, I soon came upon another battery. In fact, a succession of batteries protect us now, threaten all the open country on the other side of the river and will cover our
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 22: crossing the river at Fredericksburg. (search)
pants of this house were apparently wealthy people, the furnishings were elegant and a fine piano, an organ, violin, flute and several other musical instruments were found in it. An interesting concert (?) was enjoyed. In the cellar there was an ample supply of wines and liquors. While lying on Caroline street that day, the body of a Union soldier was found. He had been wounded in the leg, but had been bayoneted four or five times by the rebels and killed that way. A brother of Lieut. Edgar M. Newcomb arrived that day to visit him, and it was a fortunate occurrence, for he was present to nurse him on the following day when the brave lieutenant received his mortal wound. While the regiment was engaged at Fredericksburg, Benjamin Falls, of Co. A, who had been assigned the position of company cook, protested to Capt. Boyd against further service in that capacity. If you've no use for Ben Falls, said he, send me home. How nice it will look when I write to my wife that the regime
rth; and there he lay, dizzy and bleeding, still grasping the lance with both hands until Lieut. Hume caught them up. A color corporal then took it, while Edgar M. Newcomb grasped the other, the bearer of which had also fallen. Lieut. Newcomb shouted Forward and the quivering line sprang on again, but as he spoke the brave lie Joseph Seaver,DiedDec. 14. Private Daniel P. Howard,DiedDec. 15. Private Joseph W. Morrison,DiedDec. 17. Private Ezra S. Dudley,DiedDec. 13. Co. C.First Lieut. Edgar M. Newcomb,DiedDec. 20. Co. D.Private Moses C. Little,DiedDec. 11. Private Michael Redding,DiedDec. 11. Co. E.Corporal Michael Cronin,DiedDec. 13. Private Patsent. Chaplain Ezra D. Winslow, discharged for disability by S. O. 395, W. D., A. G. O. Dec. 15 to date Dec. 12. (This office was not again filled.) First Lieut. Edgar M. Newcomb, died Dec.20, 1862, at Falmouth, Va., from wounds received at Fredericksburg, Dec. 13, promoted from Second Lieutenant to First Lieutenant, to date Nov
............................................... 188 Murphy, Luke,............................................ 103 Murphy, Michael (E),............................................... 106 Murphy, Patrick (K),............................................. 58, 325 Murray, Thomas,...................................................... 341 Nelson, Leroy A.,............................................... 106, 183 Nelson's Farm,...................................................... 93 Newcomb, Edgar M.,..35, 73, 83, 98, 111, 112, 114, 118, 131, 141, 151, 161, 174, 180, 181, 182, 183, 186, 193 Newhall, Charles A.,.............................................. 36, 249 New hall, Charles B.,................................................. 249 Newport News, Va.,................................................ 118, 119 Newman, Stephen I.,............................................... 4, 89 Nichols, Benjamin,.................................................... 345 Nichols, Ernest
; Their silent ranks pass in review, With noiseless step, and voices dumb. Brave Howe is riding at their head, Tall and graceful, but ashy pale, Just as he looked when, cold and dead, We dug his grave at sad Glendale. Another rides with that silent host— Boyd, the hero of many fields— Who bravely fell at duty's post, Just as the foe the contest yields. And there George Batchelder we see, Gentle and true, and bravest of men, And there steps gallant David Lee, And Mumford's manly form we ken. Newcomb is there, with thoughtful face, In that battalion weird and vast; And brave Tom Claffy has a place, And valiant Thompson marches past. There with the men he led in fight, The handsome Ferris moves along; There's Donath, with his ways polite, And Robinson is with the throng. Three hundred of our bravest men, Who fell on Southern battle plains, Or yielded life in prison pen, That silent host of death contains. We see their faces as of old, We reach for hands we may not clasp; We nevermore ca
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, 1859. (search)
achusetts Regiment. Him sought I out, and conversed about old times. He was very cheerful, and disposed to see only the bright phases of soldier life. But he looked much too feeble to bear the fatigue and exposures of camp life, and I am afraid that he will not endure it for a long time. His last letter was written on the day before the fatal battle of Antietam, his last on earth, and proves him a true soldier, kind, faithful, appreciating, and enduring to the last. His friend, Lieutenant Newcomb of his company, writes:— After supper, in the twilight of September 16th, George took my Bible, and, as well as I can recollect, read aloud portions of the nineteenth and ninetieth Psalms. Sweet was that evening's communion: it was our last. The chief end of God's providence is to teach men, and the value of his lessons is generally according to their difficulty. How golden the knowledge, how sweet the joy we may work out from this great sorrow. We had hoped for George a glo
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