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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 4 0 Browse Search
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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 14: (search)
Wesley, which is in the press, his Brazil, to be finished in a month, his Spanish War, to which he has prefixed an interesting preface on the moral state of England, France, and Spain, between 1789 and 1808; and, finally, a poem on the War of Philip,— not him of Macedon, but our own particular Philip, recorded by Hubbard and Church,—and as this is more interesting to an American than any other of the works, it is the one I most carefully followed, as he read me all he has written of it. Oliver Newman was left unfinished. Mr. Southey promised Mr. Ticknor the autograph manuscript of this poem when it should have been published, and this promise was remembered and redeemed, after the poet's death, by his children. Mr. Ticknor had a pleasant correspondence with him for some years, and some of the letters from Southey appear in his Memoirs. He has, however, finished only six hundred of the six thousand lines that are to compose it, rhymed, and in various measure, but not so elaborately
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 22: (search)
hardly three weeks old, in his cradle in the same room. . . . . Southey was natural and kind, but evidently depressed, much altered since I saw him fifteen years ago, a little bent, and his hair quite white. He showed me the materials for his edition of Cowper and the beginning of the Life; the last work, he says, he shall ever do for the booksellers. Among the materials was the autograph manuscript of John Gilpin, and many letters .. . . . He read us, too, about three cantos of his Oliver Newman,—the poem on American ground,—some of it fine, but the parts intended to be humorous in very bad taste. He showed me as many curious and rare manuscripts and books as I could look at, and told me that he means now to finish his history of Portugal and Portuguese literature; and if possible write a history of the Monastic Orders. If he does the last, it will be bitter enough. He says he has written no Quarterly Review for two years, and means to write no more; that reviews have done m