Your search returned 834 results in 275 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ...
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 17 (search)
aterials found on the spot; so that Thomas got his advance corps over during the 16th, and marched as far as Calhoun, where he came into communication with McPherson's troops, which had crossed the Oostenaula at Lay's Ferry by our pontoon-bridges, previously laid. Inasmuch as the bridge at Resaca was overtaxed, Hooker's Twentieth Corps was also diverted to cross by the fords and ferries above Resaca, in the neighborhood of Echota. On the 17th, toward evening, the head of Thomas's column, Newton's division, encountered the rear-guard of Johnston's army near Adairsville. I was near the head of column at the time, trying to get a view of the position of the enemy from an elevation in an open field. My party attracted the fire of a battery; a shell passed through the group of staff-officers and burst just beyond, which scattered us promptly. The next morning the enemy had disappeared, and our pursuit was continued to Kingston, which we reached during Sunday forenoon, the 19th. Fr
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 19 (search)
so crossed over at Roswell, drove away the cavalry-pickets, and held its ground till relieved by Newton's division of Howard's corps, which was sent up temporarily, till it in turn was relieved by Dodng on Hooker's corps (the Twentieth), and partially on Johnson's division of the Fourteenth, and Newton's of the Fourth. The troops had crossed Peach-Tree Creek, were deployed, but at the time were rmingled, and fought in many places hand to hand. General Thomas happened to be near the rear of Newton's division, and got some field-batteries in a good position, on the north side of Peach-Tree Creek, from which he directed a furious fire on a mass of the enemy, which was passing around Newton's left and exposed flank. After a couple of hours of hard and close conflict, the enemy retired slowly within his trenches, leaving his dead and many wounded on the field. Johnson's and Newton's losses were light, for they had partially covered their fronts with light parapet; but Hooker's whole cor
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 20 (search)
ntitled to, and claimed, their discharge, by reason of the expiration of their term of service; so that with victory and success came also many causes of disintegration. The rebel General Wheeler was still in Middle Tennessee, threatening our railroads, and rumors came that Forrest was on his way from Mississippi to the same theatre, for the avowed purpose of breaking up our railroads and compelling us to fall back from our conquest. To prepare for this, or any other emergency, I ordered Newton's division of the Fourth Corps back to Chattanooga, and Corse's division of the Seventeenth Corps to Rome, and instructed General Rousseau at Nashville, Granger at Decatur, and Steadman at Chattanooga, to adopt the most active measures to protect and insure the safety of our roads. Hood still remained about Lovejoy's Station, and, up to the 15th of September, had given no signs of his future plans; so that with this date I close the campaign of Atlanta, with the following review of our re
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 21 (search)
rest, made its appearance at Athens, Alabama, and captured its garrison. General Newton's division (of the Fourth Corps), and Corse's (of the Seventeenth), were se and a regiment of three hundred and fifty men sent to its relief. I have sent Newton's division up to Chattanooga in cars, and will send another division to Rome. General: I have your dispatch of to-day. I have already sent one division (Newton's) to Chattanooga, and another (Corse's) to Rome. Our armies are much reducety-third Corps). General Thomas, also, had been dispatched to Chattanooga, with Newton's division of the Fourth Corps and Morgan's of the Fourteenth Corps, leaving Gehe 16th I telegraphed to General Thomas, at Nashville: Send me Morgan's and Newton's old divisions. Reestablish the road, and I will follow Hood wherever he may General Schofield arrived, with the two divisions of Generals Wagner (formerly Newton's) and Morgan, which were returned to their respective corps (the Fourth and Fo
Clarke, James A. Semple,Geo. Ritchie, John Johnston,Jas. O. Moore, Wm. W. J. Kelly,Richard Taylor, Henry Myers,Jas. E. Cumour. Felix Senac,  Masters in the line of promotion. Thomas B. Mills,John Grimball, Wm. C. Whittle,W. B. Hall, Wm. A. Kerr,S. W. Averill. J. E. Meyerre,  Acting Midshipmen. A. M. Mason,Geo. R. Bryan, Wm. E. Pinkney,A. T. Brady, R. C. Fant,D. Talbott, D. H. Daugherty,E. H. Edwards, Thos. L. Moore,D. H. Dyke, F. M. Robey,J. T. Mahan, H. B. Littlepage,Va. Newton, H. H. MarmadukeW. F. Clayton, R. S. Flag,T. Boughman, R. A. Camm,H. St. G. T. Brooke, F. T. Chew,Wm. Carroll, John T. Walker,Barron Carter, J. A. Merriwether,J. M. Gardner, R. H. Bacot,Thos. S. Garrett, H. C. Holt,W. D. Goode, W. C. Hutter,D. G. McClintoc, Wm. P. Mason,W. R. Mays, I. C. Holcome,C. Meyer, D. M. Scales,J. M. Morgan, E. J. McDermott,R. J. Moses, Jr., D. A. Telfair,J. A. Peters, W. C. Jackson,Jeff. Phelps, W. W. Read,C. T. Sevier, Daniel Carroll,G. W. Sparks,
ad. The Eighty-fourth Pennsylvania suffered more than any other. This regiment, of which there were only three hundred engaged, lost twenty-three in killed and sixty-three in wounded, one third of them falling from the bullets of the enemy, and among them Colonel Murray, already alluded to, and Capt. Gregory and Lieut. Ream. Another of the unfortunates was Col. Thoburn, wounded in the arm and breast, not dangerously, however. The firing ceased, and the enemy fell rapidly back towards Newton. Gen. Banks had been called away to Washington, and was not present during the battle, but arrived this morning early, and resumed the command, and now follows up the enemy most vigorously, driving him very rapidly before him, and is to-night in Strasburg, expecting that the enemy will make a stand, so as to cover their baggage-trains. The Federal loss as ascertained thus far, is less than one hundred killed and two hundred wounded. The enemy's loss was much greater. Engaged in the batt
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 9.-the battle of West-point, Va. Fought May 7, 1862. (search)
fighting, of course there were many very singular scenes. Capt. Montgomery, Gen. Newton's Chief-of-staff, and Lieut. Baker, of Gen. Franklin's staff, ventured too four reinforcements. At seven o'clock I was sent out by Generals Franklin and Newton to make a reconnoissance of the ground around us in an engineering view, so thaas the enemy was preparing to attack us in numbers, I took my position with General Newton, who had drawn up the brigade for action about half a mile behind where I wulness over me. It was about one o'clock P. M. when I received an order from Gen. Newton to go forward into the woods to ascertain whether the rebels were falling baa horse, I was lifted on his back, and returned to the field and reported to Gen. Newton for duty. He kindly told me that I had distinguished myself enough this dayats cut from ear to ear! Savages themselves would blush at such barbarity. Gen. Newton conducted the engagement, Gen. Franklin arriving at twelve M. on the field.
backward and forward, first one yielding and then the other. An idea of the great magnitude of this portion of the fight may be obtained, when I say that this part of the line was successively reenforced by McCall's reserves, the brigades of General Newton, Colonel Bartlett and Colonel Taylor, of Slocum's division, and it was not until the last fresh brigade was hurled against them that they were beaten back. In this part of the engagement we took about fifty prisoners, who said that in just t nearly all of them stood their ground with firmness, behaving most gallantly. Particularly was this the case with the Ninth Massachusetts, the Fourth Michigan, the Fourteenth New-York, of Griffin's brigade, the Ninety-fifth Pennsylvania, of General Newton's brigade, and the Sixteenth New-York, of Colonel Bartlett's brigade. The Sixty-second Pennsylvania, of Griffin's brigade, met an overwhelming force of the enemy, who took them on the flank, and, after a desperate resistance, they succeeded
advantage early in the day on the left, and subsequently the right, but was finally repulsed with great slaughter. Our own losses have been heavy, including many officers of worth and position. For the present I can only mention the following: Killed: Brigadier-Generals Starke and Branch; Colonel Douglas, of the Thirteenth Georgia, commanding brigade; Colonel Homes, of the Second Georgia; Colonel Milligan, of the Fifteenth Georgia; Colonel S. B. Smith, of the Twenty-seventh Georgia; Colonel Newton, of the Sixth Georgia; Captain Nesbit, commanding Third Georgia, and Lieutenant-Colonel Barclay, of the Twenty-third Georgia, (reported killed;) Major T. S. McIntosh, of General McLaw's staff, and Lieutenant S. B. Parkman, of Read's Georgia battery. Also, Col. Strong, Captains Ritchie and Calloway, and Lieutenants Little and Lynne of the Sixth Louisiana, and Captain McFarland and Lieutenant Newman, of the Seventh Louisiana. Wounded: Major-General Anderson, of South-Carolina; Brigadie
advantage early in the day on the left, and subsequently the right, but was finally repulsed with great slaughter. Our own losses have been heavy, including many officers of worth and position. For the present I can only mention the following: Killed: Brigadier-Generals Starke and Branch; Colonel Douglas, of the Thirteenth Georgia, commanding brigade; Colonel Homes, of the Second Georgia; Colonel Milligan, of the Fifteenth Georgia; Colonel S. B. Smith, of the Twenty-seventh Georgia; Colonel Newton, of the Sixth Georgia; Captain Nesbit, commanding Third Georgia, and Lieutenant-Colonel Barclay, of the Twenty-third Georgia, (reported killed;) Major T. S. McIntosh, of General McLaw's staff, and Lieutenant S. B. Parkman, of Read's Georgia battery. Also, Col. Strong, Captains Ritchie and Calloway, and Lieutenants Little and Lynne of the Sixth Louisiana, and Captain McFarland and Lieutenant Newman, of the Seventh Louisiana. Wounded: Major-General Anderson, of South-Carolina; Brigadie
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ...