hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 1,193 3 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 128 4 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 121 1 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 68 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 55 5 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 47 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 46 2 Browse Search
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz) 22 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 19 3 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 19 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz). You can also browse the collection for John Newton or search for John Newton in all documents.

Your search returned 11 results in 4 document sections:

Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), I. First months (search)
es talked some time with the Chief, and then we rode to the Headquarters of General Newton, who commands the 1st Corps, hard by. This chieftain had a very gorgeous tent, erected for the express accommodation of Mrs. Newton, who, however, was soon driven forth by the general order excluding all ladies from the lines; and the tent was all that remained to remind one of her presence. General Newton also has a thick head of hair, and is a tall and finely built man and light complected. He was iion, where we found the 1st Corps taking their noon rest; also their chief, General Newton, and General (Professor) Eustis, partaking from a big basket. A spy came isay at 8.10 A. M. A little before that the General mounted and rode towards General Newton's quarters, and, while near there, bang! went a cannon on the right; then beneral Sickles, people would say, is too much of a Bowery boy. Generals French, Newton, and Sykes are out of the question. General Humphreys has no influence strong
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 3 (search)
sensual. His face has three expressions: deep thought; extreme determination; and great simplicity and calmness.] Headquarters Army of Potomac March 30, 1864 I am pretty well, I thank you, and not so blue as when I came back the other time, perhaps because the generals are here and it is not so utterly triste. However, I am fain to say I draw invidious comparisons between it and home, mais that helps nothing. There have been marvellous changes within these three weeks. Generals Sykes, Newton, French, and Pleasonton are ordered off. I do feel sorry for Sykes, an excellent soldier, always sure to do his duty, and with this army for a long time. I fear they displaced him at Washington because they disliked his rough manners. General Pleasonton was always very civil to me and I am sorry therefore to see him go. I have not yet got it clearly in my head how the corps have been shifted about, but I suppose I shall in a few days . . . . The latest joke is the heavy sell that has be
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), IV. Cold Harbor (search)
Yankee regiment would drive a brigade of them. They have no grit as a rule. The Paddies, on the contrary, will go in finely, and if well officered, stand to it through everything. . . . Having ascertained the Headquarters, I rode over to Mrs. Newton's, where I found a romantic lot of officers reposing, very flat on the grass. . . . Poor Mrs. Newton!--she was the one whose husband fell in my Raccoon Ford fight. . . . Presently arrived an aunt, a Mrs. Brockenbrough, a conceited, curious, saMrs. Newton!--she was the one whose husband fell in my Raccoon Ford fight. . . . Presently arrived an aunt, a Mrs. Brockenbrough, a conceited, curious, sallow, middle-aged woman, itching to tackle a Northerner. She said the Cavalry Provost-Marshal had been very kind to her. She then began to catechize Grant, with an eager relish, who replied with entire calmness and candor, whereat she was plainly taken aback, as she looked for a volley of gasconade! Their negro houses were full of wounded cavalry men, some of them Rebels. As we sat there the cavalry cannon began again, in the direction of Haw's store, and there followed, in the afternoon, a
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), Index (search)
roops, 102, 162, 180, 256, 262; aunty, 183; Petersburg mine, 199, 214; burying Rebel dead, 203n; arming southern, 245; poker game, 269. Nesmith, James Willis, 280; on Bull Run, 284. New London, Conn., 223. Newspapers, errors of, 100. Newton, John, 33, 56, 60, 80; visited, 9. Newton, Mrs., 131. North Anna, 122, 126. O'Connor, W. Ulick, Viscount Castle-Cuffe, 49. Officers, good quality, 11; promotion, 78; qualities of good, 121, 266; bearing of Rebel, 152. Ord, Edward Otho CNewton, Mrs., 131. North Anna, 122, 126. O'Connor, W. Ulick, Viscount Castle-Cuffe, 49. Officers, good quality, 11; promotion, 78; qualities of good, 121, 266; bearing of Rebel, 152. Ord, Edward Otho Cresap, 200, 233, 266, 320, 335, 357. Ordinary, in Virginia, 119. Otto, William Tod, 212. Ovens, Dutch, 351. Palfrey, Francis Winthrop, 65. Parke, John Grubb, 233, 234, 236, 323, 334; described, 213; engineer, 246. Parker, Isaac Brown, 288. Parker, Theodore, 260. Patrick, Marsena Rudolph, 74. Patten, Henry Lyman, 208. Pease, Charles Elliott, 358. Peeble house, 235, 254, 321. Peel, Cecil Lennox, captain, 49. Pell, Duncan Archibald, 212, 312, 319. Pemberton, John Clifford, 102.