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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Nicholls or search for Nicholls in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
ntly moved to New Orleans and assumed the Presidency of Tulane University. Colonel Johnston was received with loud applause, and made an exceeding graceful and felicitous address, appropriately introducing General Lee, who had to stand several minutes before the deafening applause with which he was received would allow him to proceed. His address was listened to with deepest interest by the vast crowd, and frequently interrupted with enthusiastic applause. His tribute to the gallant General Nicholls (ex-Governor of the State), who lost his leg at Chancellorsville (and whose maimed form and empty sleeve were on the platform, touching testimonials of his faithful service), was as eloquent as just, and was received with deafening applause. At the close of the lecture, ladies and gentlemen crowded around General Lee to express their gratification and congatulations,—a short reception was held in the Museum of the Armory, and then the committee escorted us to one of the most magnific
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
ntly moved to New Orleans and assumed the Presidency of Tulane University. Colonel Johnston was received with loud applause, and made an exceeding graceful and felicitous address, appropriately introducing General Lee, who had to stand several minutes before the deafening applause with which he was received would allow him to proceed. His address was listened to with deepest interest by the vast crowd, and frequently interrupted with enthusiastic applause. His tribute to the gallant General Nicholls (ex-Governor of the State), who lost his leg at Chancellorsville (and whose maimed form and empty sleeve were on the platform, touching testimonials of his faithful service), was as eloquent as just, and was received with deafening applause. At the close of the lecture, ladies and gentlemen crowded around General Lee to express their gratification and congatulations,—a short reception was held in the Museum of the Armory, and then the committee escorted us to one of the most magnific