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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 1: the Boston mob (second stage).—1835. (search)
May. It came presently. He was mobbed at Montpelier, Vt., on the two days following the Boston mob, while addressing the Vermont State Anti-Slavery Society in the hall of the House of Representatives (Lib. 5.174; May's Recollections, p. 153). The Utica news you will find in S. J. May. the Journal of Commerce, though that paper evidently gives a distorted account of the matter. The mobbing of the New York State Anti-Slavery Society at its organization, on the day of the Boston mob (Niles' Register, 49.162). It bears the stamp of inconsistency on its very face. . . . We have not forgotten here, and do not mean to forget, Stanton's version of the Abolition Constitution:—Article first: All men are born free and equal. Article second: Stick and Hang. Isaac Knapp to W. L. Garrison. Boston, October 26, 1835. Ms. My heart is made glad by the receipt of your letter of the A. S. Rooms, 9 a. m. 24th inst. Thanks be to God that you are now comparatively safe from the
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 3: the Clerical appeal.—1837. (search)
quent, ——the pen drops from my hand (Lib. 7: 69). From these summits the policy of repression expanded downwards. The Washington National Intelligencer voluntarily Lib. 7.61. padlocked its own lips, agreeing to exclude all discussion of slavery from its columns except as occurring in the Congressional proceedings. The press of the District Lib. 7.66. generally garbled even these. Elsewhere, editors began injuriously to misreport the speeches at anti-slavery Lib. 7.19. meetings. Hezekiah Niles had already thought it expedient to suppress names as well as utterances. Such wretches as Garrison and Dennison, the Savannah Georgian had exclaimed in it's article on negro slavery of June 19, 1833, copied into the Register (44: 295) with blanks and this apology: The names of the persons here inserted are not worth preserving, and we have dashed them out. And finally, the churches, not to be behind the politicians in the race of subserviency to the sum of all villanies, each in its ow
position to G.'s lecturing, 209; G.'s love for, 271, sonnet to, 467. Newcomb, Stillman B., 1.280. Newell, Charlotte Lloyd, aunt of G., 1.427, trip to the Provinces, 484. Newhall, Paul, 1.31, 32. Nichols, Ichabod, Rev. [1784-1859], 1.289. Niles, Hezekiah [1777-1839], edits Register, 2.198; doubts about emancipation, 1.152; approached by Clay for G.'s release, 900; on the evils of slavery, 252; suppresses abolition names, 2.198. No-government doctrine. See Perfectionism and Non-Resisawtucket), 2.113. Recorder (Boston), gets up Am. Union, 1.469, letter from A. Tappan, 471, 472; charges G. with atheism, 472; on his mobbing, 2.36, on Channing's censure of abolitionists, 89. Refuge of Oppression, 1.453, 2.419. Register, Niles', 2.198. Reid, Elizabeth J., 2.387. Reid, Robert Raymond [1789-1844], 2.381. Religious Intelligencer (New Haven), 2.150. Remond, Charles Lenox [b. Salem, Mass., Feb. 1, 1810; d. Reading, Mass., Dec. 22, 1873], of Salem, 1.330; delegate