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Caroline E. Whitcomb, History of the Second Massachusetts Battery of Light Artillery (Nims' Battery): 1861-1865, compiled from records of the Rebellion, official reports, diaries and rosters 5 1 Browse Search
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manuscript of the entire history was read to the members present and received their support and commendation. The author wishes to express her obligation to all who have assisted in any way in the preparation of this work, and especially to W. G. Hidden, Fitchburg, Mass., for the loan of diary, newspaper clippings and suggestions, to Capt. E. K. Russell for his comments and suggestions and to Mrs. Mathews, stepdaughter of Col. O. F. Nims for the loan of papers, letters and pictures once the property of Colonel Nims. Thanks are also due Clarence K. Knowlton for the copy of the diary of his father, J. S. Knowlton, to Mrs. C. B. Maxwell for the diary of C. B. Maxwell, to Mr. George Houghton, Newport, for the diary of his father, George Houghton. The expense of the preparation and publication of the book has been borne to a large degree by Mr. E. D. Nims of Kansas City whose generosity is appreciated both by members of the Battery and by the Nims' Family Association. The Author.
Nims' Second Massachusetts Battery Few batteries during the Civil War saw more actual service than that known officially as the 2d Massachusetts Light Artillery, but more generally called Nims' Battery. Its career is well worth recording and the part it played in the campaigns of the Department of the Mississippi and the Gulf was by no means inconsiderable in the history of the war. Previous to 1861, there existed in Boston a military organization called the Boston Light Artillery or CNims' Battery. Its career is well worth recording and the part it played in the campaigns of the Department of the Mississippi and the Gulf was by no means inconsiderable in the history of the war. Previous to 1861, there existed in Boston a military organization called the Boston Light Artillery or Cook's Battery. When the news came from Baltimore that the Sixth Regiment had been fired on and the city was in the hands of rioters, General Butler who was then in Philadelphia, asked that this organization be sent forward immediately to the scene. It was midnight of April 19, 1861, when the telegraph brought the request: before the night of the 20th everything was in readiness and in the early morning of the 21st the first battery from Massachusetts was on its way to Baltimore for a period