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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 50 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 30 0 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 17 3 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge 16 2 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 12 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge sketches (ed. Estelle M. H. Merrill) 10 2 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 5 1 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman). You can also browse the collection for Charles Eliot Norton or search for Charles Eliot Norton in all documents.

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the strongest man in the village, who kept the wood-yard just across Brighton Bridge. In my memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli I have attempted to sketch the cultivated women who lived in Cambridge and were a controlling power. Mrs. Farrar, Mrs. Norton, Mrs. Howe, Mrs. King, and others,—of whom Miss Fuller herself was the representative in the next generation,—and whom I was accustomed to seeing treated with respect by educated men, although these ladies themselves had never passed through crpillars, through what is now Ward Four. There were also some well-preserved revolutionary fortifications,—one remarkably fine one on what is now Putnam Avenue,—but these have now unfortunately vanished. There were ample woods for wildflowers,— Norton's woods and Palfrey's woods especially,—and I have deposited at the Botanical Garden my early botanical notebooks, showing what rare wild-flowers, such as the cardinal flower, the fringed gentian, and the gaudy rhexia, once grew within the t
ansferred it to his brother-in-law, Mr. Justin E. Gale, who, in turn, passed it over in 1881 to Miss Margaret R. Ingols, who still carries it on. The Browne and Nichols School. In the fall of 1883, at the suggestion of Professor Child, Professor Norton, and others interested in the establishment in Cambridge of a school for boys which should effectively meet the demands of the new education, the Browne and Nichols School was founded at No. 11 Appian Way. The principals had graduated from Hhe genial Holmes, and the broad-minded Lowell. Thus an atmosphere is created which is calculated to sustain the studious spirit. Fitting School for boys and girls. In 1879, Miss K. V. Smith was encouraged by Ezra Abbot, John Fiske, Charles Eliot Norton, and Francis J. Child to open a private school for boys and girls at 16 Ash Street. It was removed the next year to 5 Phillips Place, and again changed to 54 Garden Street, and in 1887 to its present high and sunny locality at 13 Buckingha
48 was corresponding editor of the Anti-Slavery Standard, editorial correspondent of the London Daily News, and later, in 1863, was joint editor, with Professor Charles Eliot Norton, of the North American Review. Another of the Abolition editors was Rev. J. S. Lovejoy of Cambridgeport, of The Emancipator; while Rev. Thomas Whits there are Francis Ellingwood Abbott, Rev. Edward Abbott, Professor Charles F. Dunbar, Mr. Joseph Henry Allen, Francis Foxcroft, Professors Francis Bowen, Charles Eliot Norton, and Andrews Norton, Rev. William Ware, William Brewster, William D. Howells, Samuel H. Scudder, Horace E. Scudder, and Thomas Wentworth Higginson, who so Higginson, William Winter, Rev. Drs. A. P. Peabody, Alexander McKenzie, and Edward Abbott, Rt. Rev. William Lawrence, D. D., Andrew MacFarland Davis, Professors Charles Eliot Norton, William James, and Albert B. Hart, Arthur Gilman, Caroline F. Orne, Charlotte Fiske Bates, and scores of others almost as well known. The Cambridg
So great is the interest in the Prospect Union on the part of the university that there is no difficulty in finding a plenty of college men to lend their aid, and these students are among the men of highest rank in scholarship and of prominence in other respects in the university. The weekly meeting of the Union is held on Wednesday evening. At this time there is usually a lecture, often by some member of the Harvard Faculty. Lectures have been delivered by President Eliot, Professors Charles Eliot Norton, Francis G. Peabody, W. W. Goodwin, F. W. Taussig, A. B. Hart, G. H. Palmer, and many other members of the Harvard Faculty; also by Colonel Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Rt. Rev. William Lawrence, Mr. John Graham Brooks, Rt. Rev. J. H. Vincent, Mr. John Fiske, Dean George Hodges, Mrs. Julia Ward Howe, Mrs. Lucy Stone, Mrs. Alice Freeman Palmer, Miss Vida D. Scudder, Rev. Dr. Lyman Abbott, Rev. Dr. Washington Gladden, etc., etc. The lecturers, like the teachers, receive no pay for
William Newell, Nehemiah Adams, R. H. Dana, Ebenezer Francis, Jr., Andrews Norton, Alexander H. Ramsay, Richard M. Hodges, William Saunders, J. B. Dana, C. C. Little, Simon Greenleaf, J. E. Worcester, John A. Albro, C. C. Felton, Charles Beck, Morrill Wyman, James Walker, E. S. Dixwell, Converse Francis, William T. Richardson, H. W. Longfellow, Edward Everett, Asa Gray, Francis Bowen, Joseph Lovering, John Ware, John Holmes, Estes Howe, William Greenough, Robert Carter, E. N. Horsford, Charles E. Norton. Dr. Holmes remained president until his death in 1837, when Joseph Story was put in his place, Dr. Ware still remaining vice-president. Levi Hedge (Ll. D.) was treasurer until 1831, when, on account of ill-health and expected absence from town, he asked to be relieved from the cares of office, and a special meeting was called to choose his successor. Dea. William Brown was the choice of the society, and he held the post for five years, when, in September, 1836, Dr. A. H. Ramsay
t, 6; the town nearly depopulated, 6; arrival of Thomas Shepard and his congregation, 7; election on the Common, 7, 47, 48, 235; Mrs. Hutchinson sentenced at, 7; the college placed in, 8; name changed to Cambridge, 8. See Cambridge. Newtown. See Newton. Newtowne Club, 295. No-license vote, its effect upon the city, 316. Nonantum, John Eliot preaches to the Indians at, 10; within Cambridge limits, 10. North Avenue Savings Bank, 311. North Cambridge, improvements in, 128. Norton, Rev. John. criticism of Mrs. Bradstreet's verses, 2. Oakes, Rev. Urian, minister, actingpresident, and president of the college, 236. Observatory, 75, 76. Odd-Fellowship, its position, 285; strength and popularity, 285; first founded in England, 285; first American lodge, 285; its purpose, 285; its motto and aim, 285; its work, 285; Cambridge organizations, 286; buildings, 286. Old Cambridge, 2. See New Town. Oldest Cambridge, 2. See New Town. Old-time Society, An, 267-