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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 50 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 30 0 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 17 3 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge 16 2 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 12 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge sketches (ed. Estelle M. H. Merrill) 10 2 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 5 1 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge. You can also browse the collection for Charles Eliot Norton or search for Charles Eliot Norton in all documents.

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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge, Chapter 1: old Cambridge (search)
, both of his sons having contributed to military history, while his oldest daughter has written both poetry and fiction under the name of E. Foxton. Professor Charles Eliot Norton, in the same way, has prolonged and enhanced the literary eminence of his name, as did Professor F. H. Hedge and Tutor William Everett. Other instanis more curious than the impression held by some of Lowell's English friends — even, it is said, that most intimate friend to whom his letters are dedicated by Mr. Norton--that the Hosea Biglow dialect was that of Lowell's father, family, and personal circle. All who know anything of the period know that the speech of educated fliterary circle of which Longfellow was the centre; and the centre of the Cambridge circle, so far as the little town itself was concerned, he surely was. Professor Norton has left on record the perfect frankness with which Lowell and himself criticised the final revision of Longfellow's Dante, with a freedom that was made perf
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge, Chapter 2: old Cambridge in three literary epochs (search)
he first editor, William Tudor, there came a long line of Cambridge successors — Willard Phillips, Edward Tyrrel Channing, Edward Everett, Jared Sparks, John Gorham Palfrey, Francis Bowen, and, after some interval, James Russell Lowell and Charles Eliot Norton. The list of chief contributors to the first forty volumes of the Review, as appears from the Index published in 1878, would include, in addition to those already given, C. C. Felton, George Bancroft, H. W. Longfellow, and the elder Norto55; H. E. Scudder, 196; O. W. Holmes, 18I; G. P. Lathrop, 168; W. F. Apthorp, 134; Henry James, Jr., 134; J. R. Lowell, 132; T. W. Higginson, 117; T. B. Aldrich, I I; John Fiske, 89; G. E. Woodberry, 73; H. W. Longfellow, 68; C. P. Cranch, 45; C. E. Norton, 44; N. S. Shaler, 32; R. W. Emerson, 29; Henry James, Sr., 19; W. W. Story, 17; Wilson Flagg, 14; William James, 12. This is, of course, a merely quantitative estimate, in which a brief critical paper may count for as much as the most import
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge, Chapter 5: Lowell (search)
age was nearly reached; and even on Brattle Street the south side was houseless until the old Vassall House blocked the way. It was the region not merely, as Professor Norton says, of pasture land or mowing which afforded good roaming ground for schoolboys, but also one where orchards bore that rather tart fruit which schoolboys iswold, p. 257. it would appear that he was in charge of it in January, 1850, which must have been about the time of this letter. There is not, I think, in all Mr. Norton's delightful collection of Lowell's correspondence anything quite so thoroughly local, or giving so close a glimpse of Old Cambridge. The editor's preface is aghly, to respect crockery and varnish, and to cultivate self-reliance. The copious letters written by Lowell to Charles F. Briggs, and printed in full by Professor Norton, recall to me the answer of the once noted New York author, Henry T. Tuckerman, when I asked him how it was that Lowell gained applause so easily, while so m
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge, Index (search)
eath, 196. Lowell, Mrs. J. R. (Maria White), 159, 162, 176. Lowell, Percival, 94. Lowell, Rev. R. T. S., 16. Lowell, Miss, Sally, 125. Macaulay, T. B., 88. Mackenzie, Lieut. A. S., 117. Mather, Cotton, 4, 7. Mather, Pres., Increase, 7. Mather, Rev., Richard, 7. Milton, John, 90, 189. Mitchell, Dr., Weir, 82. Moore, Thomas, 91. Morse, J. T., Jr., 92, 100. Morton, Thomas, 29. Motley, J. L., 63, 68, 71, 83, 191. Newell, W. W., 150. Norton, Andrews, 14, 44, 48, 49. Norton, Prof. C. E., 16, 28, 37,44, 148, 160, 172. Nuttall, Thomas, 13. Oakes, Pres., Urian, 7. Oliver, Mrs., 151. Oliver, Lieut. Gov., 153. Oliver, Lieut., Thomas, 150, 151, 152. Page, W. H., 69. Palfrey, Rev. J. G., 16, 44, 50. Palfrey, Miss Sarah H., 16. Parker, Rev., Theodore, 53, 58, 62, 63, 67, 104, 179, 180, 181. Parsons, Charles, 77. Parsons, T. W., 67. Paul, Jean, (see Richter). Peirce, Benjamin, 16. Peirce, Prof., Benjamin, 143. Peirce, C. S., 16. Peirce, J. M., 16. Perci