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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 12 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: Introduction., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Index, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
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uilding was soon wrapped in flames. The rebels then ceased answering from their guns, and after shelling the position awhile, the Point Pleasant batteries stopped also.--St. Louis Republican. Governor Curtin issued a general order congratulating the Eighty-fourth and One Hundred and Tenth Pennsylvania regiments for gallant conduct at Winchester, Va., and directed that Winchester be inscribed on their flags, and the order be read at the head of all Pennsylvania regiments. Lieut. Fitz-James O'Brien, of Gen. Lander's staff, died at Cumberland, Md., from the effects of the wound received in the fight at Blooming Gap, Va.--Baltimore American, April 7. A battle between the National gunboat Kineo and the flag-ship of the rebel flotilla, a few miles above the Passes of the Mississippi River, resulting in the defeat of the rebel vessel.--(Doc. 118.) At New Orleans, La., all masters of steam-boats engaged in trade were inhibited from taking white men as deck-hands, and were
Rebellion Record: Introduction., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore), Contents of Thie first volume. (search)
F. De Haas Janvier,14 19.A Vision of January 4, Catherine Ledyard,14 20.A Northern Rally, John Clancy,14 21.Out and Fight, C. G. Leland,15 22.Massachusetts Regiment, Almira Seymour,15 23.The Secession Flag, Josephine Morss,15 24.Up, Brothers, All! Fannie Fales, 16 25.Yankee Doodle's Suggestions, G. W. Westbrook,16 26.The Stars and Stripes,16 27.God Save our Native Land! Jas. Walden,17 28.Our Fatherland,17 29.The New Year and the Union, Geo. D. Prentice,17 30.The Seventh, Fitz-James O'Brien,17 31.The United States Flag, W. Ross Wallace,18 32.National Guard Marching Song, A. J. H. Duganne,19 33.Songs of the Rebels: War Song,19 34.Songs of the Rebels: On Fort Sumter,19 35.A New-Song of Sixpence, Vanity Fair,23 36.The Great Bell Roland, Theo. Tilton,29 37.The Sentinel of the 71st, J. B. Bacon,29 38.Work to Do, R. H. Stoddard,29 39. All we Ask is to be let alone, Hartford Courant,30 40.Original Ode, Charleston, S. C., July 4,30 41.The New Birth, W. W. Howe,31 42.A
hmen, Come out, P. 5 Northrop, Col., rebel army, D. 84 Northrup, H. D., D. 38 Norton, Frank H., P. 3 Norwich, Conn., war spirit in, D. 84 Norwich (Conn.) Bulletin, editor of, and Jeff. Davis, P. 24 Norwalk, O., Union meeting at, D. 27 Noyes, William Curtis, speech at N. Y., April 20, Doc. 111 Number one, by H. D. Sedgewick, P. 119 Nurses, department of, U. S. A., D. 84 O Oath of allegiance administered at Washington, D. 22 O'Brien, Fitz-James, account of the march of the 7th Regiment, N. Y. S. M., Doc. 148; notice of, P. 17 Ocean Eagle captured by privateer, D. 71 Ode for 1861, by H. Hastings Weld, P. 133 Ode to the North and South, P. 102 O'Donnell, William, P. 56 Ogden, Judge, of N. J., definition of treason, D. 60 Ogdensburg, N. Y., Union at, D. 33; war spirit of, P. 81 O'Gorman, Richard, Doc. 135; speech at N. Y., April 20, Doc. 102 Ohio, patriotism of the people of, D. 37
Department. I respectfully commend Col. S. S. Carroll to your notice. He is a most efficient and gallant officer. Lieuts. H. G. Armstrong, A. A.G., and Fitz-James O'Brien, Aid-de-Camp, joined me in the charge by which the rebel officers were captured, and confidence restored, after the cavalry had been checked. O'Brien was sO'Brien was shot through the breast by a rebel whilst out scouting. F. W. Lander, Brigadier-General. The following official recognition of the services of Gen. Lander, was made by President Lincoln. war Department, Washington, February 17. To Brig.-Gen. F. W. Lander: The President directs me to say that he has observed with pleasure, tHis appeal was answered by one private named John Cannon, a Virginia refugee. Gen. Lander charged, followed by Major Armstrong, Assistant Adjutant-General; Fitz-James O'Brien, the well-known poet of his staff; and Major Bannister, Paymaster U. S.A., who had volunteered for the expedition. A group of rebel officers were distant a
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 6: the short story (search)
y rendered. Rose Terry came gradually, an evolution, without noise or sensation; not so Fitz-James O'Brien (1828-62), who, after his The Diamond Lens (January, 1858), was hailed loudly as a new Poe. O'Brien's career in America was meteoric. He appeared unheralded, in 1852, an adventurer who had been educated in Dublin University, and who had squandered a rich patrimony in London. For ten yea undoubted power, but they are not to be compared with the best work of Hawthorne and Poe. What O'Brien might have done had he lived into the next period of the short story it is idle to conjecture.mith has as a background a New York slum street drawn with all the pitiless realism of a Zola. O'Brien added the sense of actuality to Poe's unlocalized romance, but his influence was not large. a tabulator, as cool and accurate as even his brother William James, the psychologist. Unlike O'Brien and the others, he threw away completely the machinery of the mid-century tale—not without regr
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
7, 401, 406 Norton, Andrews, 197, 207, 208, 209-211 Norton, Charles Eliot, 39, 197, 247, 401 Norton, Rev., John, 209 Norwood or village life in New England, 217 Notes on the situation, 318 Notes on Virginia, 201 Notes on Walt Whitman as Poet and Person, 262 n. Nothing to wear, 241 Nott, Henry Junius, 152 Novellettes of a traveller, or, Odds and ends from the Knapsack of Thomas Singularity, journeyman printer, 152 November Boughs, 272 Oath of freedom, 305 O'Brien, Fitz-James, 373-374, 375 O Captain! My Captain! 286 O'Connor, Wm. Douglas, 270, 388 Octave Thanet. See French, Alice October idyl, an, 381 Odd-Fellow's Offering, The, 170, 175 Odd Miss Todd, 373 Ode on the Confederate dead, 301, 303, 304, 309-310 Ode recited at the Harvard Commemoration, 286, 287 Ogden vs. Saunders, 93 n. O'Hara, Theodore, 290, 311 O. Henry. See Porter, William Sydney Old black Joe, 353 Old Chester tales, 390 Old Creole days, 384 Old-Fash
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
those stirring days. To him, indeed, the victory of 1865 meant not Appomatox but marriage, an excellent editorial position in Boston, and the publication of his collected poems in the renowned Blue and Gold series of Ticknor and Fields—an event in Boston, as Bliss Perry remarks, equivalent to election to the French Academy. In New York he had been associated with the foremost writers of the school there-most intimately with Bayard Taylor, the Stoddards, Stedman, William Winter, and Fitz-James O'Brien. These and other members of the group agreed in condemning Boston and respectability in general, and espousing beauty and an enfranchised moral life. Yet their freedom was one of manners rather than of morals; even the Bohemians—headed by the satiric Henry Clapp——who foregathered at Pfaff's below the pavement at 647 Broadway and gave free rein to their impulses, seem to have had the usual impulses of the Hebraizing Anglo-Saxon if not of the Puritan. Aldrich was not a Bohemian of an
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
n Italy, 488 Notes on a voyage to California, 144 Notes on Columbus, 184 Notes on political economy (Cardozo), 433 Notes on political economy (Ware), 434 Notes on railroad accidents, 198 Notes on the United States of America, 406 Notes on Virginia, 429 Notes . . . relating to the town of Brooklyn, 179 Nott, Eliphalet, 413 Nourse, J. E., 168 Novel: what it is, the, 88 Nozze di Figaro, 449 Nu sund wi in Amerika, 583 Nye, Edgar Wilson, 27 Oakes, Urian, 533 O'Brien, Fitz-James, 36 Observations concerning the increase of mankind, 428 Observations on the Act for granting an Excise on Wine, 427 Observations on the agriculture . . . of the United States, 429 Observations on the language of Chaucer, 484 Observations on the source and effects of unequal wealth, 436 O'Callaghan, E. B., 179, 180 Ocean burial, 514 Octopus, the, 93 Octoroon, the, 266 Ode in time of hesitation, 64 Ode on the Unveiling of the Shaw Memorial on Boston common, 37 Od