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The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
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every siege, contributing also to the efficiency of the field telegraphers. Beckwith remained Grant's cipher operator to the end of the war. He it was who tapped a wire and reported the hiding-place of Wilkes Booth. The youngest boy operator, O'Brien, began by refusing a princely bribe to forge a telegraphic reprieve, and later won distinction with Butler on the James and with Schofield in North Carolina. W. R. Plum, who wrote a History of the Military Telegraph in the Civil War, also renderibility of such distinction and recognition as come to the soldier who wins promotion, was exceedingly high. operator to the end of the war, and was the man who tapped a wire and reported the hiding-place of Wilkes Booth. Another operator, Richard O'Brien, in 1863 refused a princely bribe to forge a telegraphic reprieve, and later won distinction with Butler on the James and with Schofield in North Carolina. W. R. Plum, who wrote History of the Military Telegraph in the Civil War, also rende
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), O'Brien, Richard 1758-1824 (search)
O'Brien, Richard 1758-1824 Naval officer; born in Maine in 1758; commanded a privateer in the Revolutionary War, and was an officer on the brig Jefferson in 1781; was captured by the Dey of Algiers, and enslaved for many years, carrying a ball and chain until a service performed for his master's daughter alleviated his condition. Thomas Jefferson, while Secretary of State (1797), procured his emancipation, and appointed him an agent for the United States. He died in Washington, D. C., Feb. 14, 1824.