Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: April 9, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for O'Connell or search for O'Connell in all documents.

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O'Connell and the times' correspondent. The Mr. Russell, who now represents the London Times here, is the same gentleman who was sent by that journal to Ireland, to report O'Connell's speeches during the Repeal agitation. One of the first meeO'Connell's speeches during the Repeal agitation. One of the first meetings the newspaper man attended was in Kerry. Having heard of O'Connell's polite qualities, he thought he would ask that gentleman's permission to take a verbatim account of the oration. The "Liberator" not only consented, but, in his oiliest manO'Connell's polite qualities, he thought he would ask that gentleman's permission to take a verbatim account of the oration. The "Liberator" not only consented, but, in his oiliest manner, informed the assembled audience that "until that gintleman was provided with all writing' conveniences, he wouldn't spake a word," assuming an extra brogue, which was altogether unnecessary. Russell was delighted. The preparations began, and cience, I won't begin the speech till the London gintleman is entirely ready." After waiting another moment or so, O'Connell advanced; eyes glistened; ears were all attention; and the reportorial pencil arose.--Dan gave one more benignant smile