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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
roprietor without charge), and General Lee was heard with deeply interested enthusiasm, by as highly intelligent and appreciative an auditory as often greets a speaker. It was especially fitting that Alabama's soldier-Governor, the gallant General O'Neal, should preside on the occasion, and introduced General Lee, for he had commanded the advance brigade of Rodes's division, which so gloriously opened the battle by crushing Howard's corps. General Lee put into his address a graceful tribute to General O'Neal, which was received with loud applause. At the conclusion of the lecture, General Lee received from some Virginia ladies a beautiful basket of flowers, the basket being made from willows gathered at Chancellorsville, and was warmly greeted by a daughter of Mr. Chancellor, who was in the basement of the Chancellor house up to the time when it took fire. Leaving this beautiful and hospitable city, where it would have been delightful to have remained many days, we went on t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
roprietor without charge), and General Lee was heard with deeply interested enthusiasm, by as highly intelligent and appreciative an auditory as often greets a speaker. It was especially fitting that Alabama's soldier-Governor, the gallant General O'Neal, should preside on the occasion, and introduced General Lee, for he had commanded the advance brigade of Rodes's division, which so gloriously opened the battle by crushing Howard's corps. General Lee put into his address a graceful tribute to General O'Neal, which was received with loud applause. At the conclusion of the lecture, General Lee received from some Virginia ladies a beautiful basket of flowers, the basket being made from willows gathered at Chancellorsville, and was warmly greeted by a daughter of Mr. Chancellor, who was in the basement of the Chancellor house up to the time when it took fire. Leaving this beautiful and hospitable city, where it would have been delightful to have remained many days, we went on t