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John D. Billings, Hardtack and Coffee: The Unwritten Story of Army Life 5 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in John D. Billings, Hardtack and Coffee: The Unwritten Story of Army Life. You can also browse the collection for Miles O'Reilly or search for Miles O'Reilly in all documents.

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wn as Tattoo. But this was Tattoo in the artillery. A somewhat more inspiriting call was that of the infantry, which gave the bugler quite full scope as a soloist. Here it is:-- Ere the last tone had died away, we could hear, when camped near enough to the infantry for the purpose, a very comical medley of names and responses coming from the several company streets of the various regiments within ear-shot. It was Jones! --Brown! --Smith! --Joe Smith! --Green! --Gray! --O'Neil! --O'Reilly! --O'Brien! and so on through the nationalities, only that the names were intermingled. Then, the responses were replete with character. I believe it to be among the abilities of a man of close observation to write out quite at length prominent characteristics of an entire company, by noting carefully the manner in which the men answer Here! at roll-call. Every degree of pitch in the gamut was represented. Every degree of force had its exponent. Some answered in a low voice, only to
old clothes, he at once expressed them back to his home. But, as I have intimated, such men were few in number, and, while war made this class more selfish, yet its community of hardship and danger and suffering developed sympathy and large-hearted generosity among 223 the rank and file generally, and they shared freely with their less fortunate but worthy comrades. Nothing, to my mind, better illustrates the fraternity developed in the army than the following poem, composed by Private Miles O'Reilly:-- We've drank from the same canteen. There are bonds of all sorts in this world of ours, Fetters of friendship and ties of flowers, And true lover's knots, I ween. The girl and the boy are bound by a kiss, But there's never a bond, old friend, like this-- We have drank from the same canteen. We drank from the same canteen. It was sometimes water, and sometimes milk, And sometimes apple-jack fine as silk. But, whatever the tipple has been, We shared it together, in bane or bl
Magoffin, Beriah, 280 Marietta, Ga., 404 Meade, George G., 72, 262, 304, 313, 340,344,349,359,367,371-75 Meade Station, Va., 351 Medical examination, 41-42 Merrimac, 271 Mine Run campaign, 134, 308, 347 Monitor, 270 Morgan, C. H., 267 Mosby, John S., 370 Mules, 279-97 Myer, Albert J., 395-96 Nelson, William, 405 Newburg, N. Y., 395 New York Herald, 403; North Cambridge, Mass., 44 Old Capitol Prison, 162 Olustee, Fl., 270 Ord, E. O. C., 264 O'Reilly, Miles, 223 Parke, John G., 260-61 Patrick Station, Va., 351 Pay, 97-99, 215,225 Peace Party, 16 Peach Tree Creek, Ga., 308 Peninsular campaign, 52, 155,198, 303,356-59,378 Perryville, Md., 355 Petersburg, 57-58, 120, 159, 177, 238,286,320,350,381,393,403 Pickett, George E., 407 Pine Mountain, Ga., 404 Pittsfield, Mass., 44 Pleasant Valley, Md., 346 Poems: The Army Bean, 137-38; The Army mule in time of peace, 297; The charge of the mule brigade, 295-97; The s