Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Oden or search for Oden in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

rsonal danger. I am particularly under obligations to Captain Biddle for valuable suggestions in relation to the posting and arranging of the artillery. I am under great obligations to the gallant Lieutenant Wickliffe Cooper, Dr. Irwin, Captains Baldwin, Stacy and Kendrick, of your staff, some of whom had travelled twenty-five miles after hearing the cannonading of the morning, for valuable aid given me during the second and third engagements. Colonels Lucas, Link, Mahan, Korff, Landrum, Oden, Munday, McMillan, Majors Kempton, Orr, Morrison, Captain Baird, Lieut. Lamphere, and Sergeant Brown, of the battery, greatly distinguished themselves during the action, together with other officers whose names I have not got. The enemy say they had about twelve thousand infantry, four thousand cavalry, and fifteen pieces of artillery, who were all veteran troops, most of them having been in the army since the commencement of the war. Their loss in killed was about two hundred and fifty, a
rsonal danger. I am particularly under obligations to Captain Biddle for valuable suggestions in relation to the posting and arranging of the artillery. I am under great obligations to the gallant Lieutenant Wickliffe Cooper, Dr. Irwin, Captains Baldwin, Stacy and Kendrick, of your staff, some of whom had travelled twenty-five miles after hearing the cannonading of the morning, for valuable aid given me during the second and third engagements. Colonels Lucas, Link, Mahan, Korff, Landrum, Oden, Munday, McMillan, Majors Kempton, Orr, Morrison, Captain Baird, Lieut. Lamphere, and Sergeant Brown, of the battery, greatly distinguished themselves during the action, together with other officers whose names I have not got. The enemy say they had about twelve thousand infantry, four thousand cavalry, and fifteen pieces of artillery, who were all veteran troops, most of them having been in the army since the commencement of the war. Their loss in killed was about two hundred and fifty, a
any hour. I had determined, however, to fight before giving up the advanced position I then held, hoping that reinforcements, forage, and provisions would arrive. During the four days my horses had been fed with corn but twice. The country south of Big Hill is entirely destitute, and subsistence for cavalry must be sent from Lexington. To supply one cavalry regiment at the Gap one hundred wagons will be required. I had a narrow escape. Shortly after the above encounter, while with Col. Oden, some distance behind our men, a hundred rebels dashed down the road after us. Fortunately I had placed about two hundred Tennessee infantry in the bushes on the roadside, who fired on the enemy as they were seizing us. Several of them were killed and wounded, the rest driven back, and we saved. At the time the Tennesseeans fired there was not a man of my regiment in sight. In company with my deliverers I hastened to the camp, where I found about two hundred men, and tried to rally them.