hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 19 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 14, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Oglethorpe or search for Oglethorpe in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
velop into an Academy of Arts and Sciences, the like of which has never existed within the limits of this State. Grievous indeed has been our loss, and sincerely do we lament the demise of such a friend, counselor, and patron. Although born in the city of Philadelphia on the 19th of July, 1827, Mr. George Wymberley-Jones DeRenne was, in every thought and emotion, a Georgian most loyal. In the paternal line he was the direct descendant of Captain Noble Jones, the trusted Lieutenant of Oglethorpe, whose watchful eye and brave sword were ever instant for the protection of the infant colony against the enroachments of the jealous Spaniards and the incursions of the restless Indians. Our early records are rendered illustrious by the valor, circumspection, and cool daring which he exhibited on various occasions of doubt and danger. Among the patriot names shedding lustre upon the period when our people were engaged in the effort to rid themselves of Kingly rule, none in Georgia was
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of Dr. G. W. Derenne. (search)
velop into an Academy of Arts and Sciences, the like of which has never existed within the limits of this State. Grievous indeed has been our loss, and sincerely do we lament the demise of such a friend, counselor, and patron. Although born in the city of Philadelphia on the 19th of July, 1827, Mr. George Wymberley-Jones DeRenne was, in every thought and emotion, a Georgian most loyal. In the paternal line he was the direct descendant of Captain Noble Jones, the trusted Lieutenant of Oglethorpe, whose watchful eye and brave sword were ever instant for the protection of the infant colony against the enroachments of the jealous Spaniards and the incursions of the restless Indians. Our early records are rendered illustrious by the valor, circumspection, and cool daring which he exhibited on various occasions of doubt and danger. Among the patriot names shedding lustre upon the period when our people were engaged in the effort to rid themselves of Kingly rule, none in Georgia was