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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Albany, (search)
am Bull) from South Carolina. were present. With the latter came the grand sachem and some chiefs of the Catawbas, a nation which had long waged war with the Iroquois. There was an immense number of the Six Nations present. The royal governors failed to gain anything for themselves in the way of a. revenue. but satisfactory arrangements with the Indians, including the tribes along the southern borders of Lake Erie, were made. At that conference the commissioners from Massachusetts (Andrew Oliver and Thomas Hutchinson) presented a memorial for adoption, praying the King so far to interpose as that, while the French remained in Canada, the more southern colonies, which were not immediately exposed to hostilities, might be obliged to contribute in a just proportion towards the expense of protecting the inland portions of New York and New England. Clinton and Shirley signed and approved of the memorial, which was sent with it to the Board of Trade and Plantations. Third colonial
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hutchinson, Thomas 1711-1780 (search)
usetts Assembly. They were finally published, and created intense excitement throughout the colonies. The tempest of indignation which they raised was fearful to Hutchinson and his friends. When a committee waited upon him for an explicit answer as to the authenticity of his own letters, he replied, They are mine, but were quite confidential. This was not satisfactory, and the Assembly adopted a petition to the King for his removal. The writers of the letters were Thomas Hutchinson, Andrew Oliver (lieutenant-governor), Charles Paxton, Thomas Moffatt, Robert Auchmuty, Nathaniel Rogers, and George Rome. See Franklin, Benjamin. So eager was the King to see Governor Hutchinson, of Massachusetts, on his arrival in England in July, 1774, that he was hurried by Lord Dartmouth to the presence of his Majesty without time to change his clothes. He gave the King much comfort. He assured him that the Port Bill was a wise and effective method for bringing the Boston people into submissi
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Oliver, Andrew 1706-1774 (search)
Oliver, Andrew 1706-1774 Governor; born in Boston, March 28, 1706; graduated at Harvard in 1724; a representative in the General Court from 1743 to 1746; one of his Majesty's council from 1746 to 1765; secretary of the province from 1756 to 1770; and succeeded Hutchinson (his brother-inlaw) as lieutenant-governor. In 1765 he was hung in effigy because he was a stamp distributer, and his course in opposition to the patriotic party in Boston caused him to share the unpopularity of Hutchinson. His letters, with those of Hutchinson, were sent by Franklin to Boston, and created great commotion there. He died in Boston, March 3, 1774. See Hutchinson, Thomas.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Oliver, Peter 1822-1855 (search)
e Puritan character, and severely criticised the Puritan policy. He died at sea in 1855. Jurist; born in Boston, Mass., March 26, 1713; was a brother of Andrew Oliver, and graduated at Harvard in 1730. After holding several offices, he was made judge of the Supreme Court of Massachusetts in 1756, and in 1771 chief-justice othe British army in March, 1776. He went to England, where he lived on a pension from the British crown. He was an able writer of both prose and poetry. Chief-Justice Oliver, on receiving his appointment, refused to accept his salary from the colony, and was impeached by the Assembly and declared suspended until the issue of thssue of the impeachment was reached. The Assembly of Massachusetts had voted the five judges of the Superior Court ample salaries from the colonial treasury, and called upon them to refuse the corrupting pay from the crown. Only Oliver refused, and he shared the fate of Hutchinson. He died in Birmingham, England, Oct. 13, 1791.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Oliver, Thomas 1734-1815 (search)
Oliver, Thomas 1734-1815 Royal governor; born in Dorchester, Mass., Jan. 5, 1734; graduated at Harvard in 1753; succeeded Lieut.-Gov. Andrew Oliver (of another family) in March, 1774, and in September following was compelled by the people of Boston to resign. He took refuge with the British troops in Boston, and fled with them to Halifax in 1776, and thence to England. He died in Bristol, England, Nov. 29, 1815.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Perry, Matthew Calbraith 1794-1858 (search)
Perry, Matthew Calbraith 1794-1858 Naval officer; born in Newport, R. I., April 10, 1794; was a brother of Commodore Oliver 11. Perry, and entered the navy as midshipman in 1809. In command of the Cyane, in 1819, he fixed the locality of the settlement of Liberia. He captured several pirate vessels in the West Indies from 1821 to 1824, and was employed on shore from 1833 to 1841, when he again, as commodore, went to sea in command of squadrons for several years, engaging in the siege of Vera Cruz in 1847. From 1852 to 1854 he commanded the expedition to Japan, and negotiated a very important treaty with the rulers of that empire, which has led to wonderful results in the social and religious condition of that people, and secured great advantages to America. A monument commemorating Commodore Perry's visit to Japan was erected at Kurihama, Japan, in 1901. In a circular sent out by the American Association of Japan, of which the Japanese Minister of Justice is president, the
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Massachusetts (search)
Parliament on foreign molasses imported into British colonies; called the sugar or molasses act......1764 Stamp Act passed by Parliament......March, 1765 Andrew Oliver, secretary of Massachusetts, accepts the office of distributer of stamps for the province......August, 1765 Oliver hanged in effigy on a tree (Liberty Tree)Oliver hanged in effigy on a tree (Liberty Tree), and in the evening his house is damaged by the mob......Aug. 14, 1765 Lieutenant-Governor Hutchinson's house mobbed and everything in it destroyed, among other things many manuscripts relating to the history of the province, which he had been thirty years in collecting, and which could not be replaced, are lost......Aug. 26. a memorial to the House of Lords; and a petition to the House of Commons. The tone of all these was loyal.] Stamp Act goes into effect......Nov. 1, 1765 Andrew Oliver is compelled to resign his office......Dec. 17, 1765 Population of Massachusetts, 238,423......1765 Dr. Benjamin Franklin meets Commons in committee of t
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 7: colonial newspapers and magazines, 1704-1775 (search)
England magazines. See his Lists of New England magazines, in Publications of the colonial Society of Massachusetts, vol. XIII, pp. 69-74. Newspapers are easily enough distinguished in general by the attempt to give items of current news. Outside the regular news sheets, there is a strange assortment of colonial productions usually classed as magazines, but in many cases hardly recognizable as such. For instance, William Livingston's Independent Reflector, or weekly essays and also Andrew Oliver's Censor, are nothing more than single essays published serially. The Censor was published in weekly reply to Mucius Scaevola and other writers of the Spy. The very meaning of the word magazine in the eighteenth century makes classification difficult. It was literally a storehouse, being applied to literature as a collection ; almost any assemblage of writings, especially if published serially, could be referred to as a magazine. Even the regular London magazines of the period were ma
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 2: the early drama, 1756-1860 (search)
t first glance, for it was made a vehicle for the expression of democratic ideals, and this strengthened its hold on the American people. The most significant of this group of Philadelphia dramatists was George Henry Boker. His first play, Calaynos, is a tragedy based on the hatred of the Spaniards for the Moors. Previous to its performance in Philadelphia in 1851, it had a long run at the Sadlers Wells Theatre in London in 1849, where Samuel Phelps played Calaynos and G. K. Dickenson, Oliver. Calaynos, Lond. ed., n.d., p. 8. His second tragedy, Leonor de Guzman, produced in 1853, was also laid in Spain and is concerned with the revenge of the injured Queen, Maria of Portugal. His comedy The betrothal, The facts given here and in the Bibliography are based upon the manuscripts of Boker, in the possession of his family. produced successfully in Philadelphia and New York in 1850, and played in England in 1853, is laid in Italy. With the exception of Under a Mask, a prose
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
Observations on the importance of the American Revolution, etc., 147 Observations on the New Constitution, 148 Octavia Brigaldi, 224 Odds and ends, 239 Ode on the late General Wolfe, 123 Ode on the prospect of peace, 177 Ode to friendship, 176 Odell, Rev., Jonathan, 173, 174 Of ancient and modern Confederacies, 146 Of the Meanes of disposing the enemies to peace, 97 Old bachelor, the, 237 Oldmixon, John, 26 Old Oaken Bucket, the, 279 Old South Church, 20 Oliver, Andrew, 121 Oliver Oldschool, 234 Ollapodiana, 241 Omoo, 321 On conciliation with America, 212 On the Conqueror of America shut up in Boston, 139 On the death of Captain Nicholas Biddie, 183 On the five points of Calvinism, 66 On the human understanding, 57 On the nature, extent and perfection of the divine Goodness, 79 On the prospect of planting Arts and learning in America, 214 On the rise and progress of the differences between great Britain and her American coloni
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