hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 27 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 35 results in 5 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), All quiet along the <rs>Potomac</rs> to-night--proof that it was written by Thaddeus Oliver, of Twiggs county, Georgia. (search)
ac to-night--proof that it was written by Thaddeus Oliver, of Twiggs county, Georgia. We have reomac to-night, was written by his father (Thaddeus Oliver), and we regret that our space will not allow us to publish the paper in full. Mr. Oliver, after introducing two very sweet poems of his f a train of facts which convinces me that Thaddeus Oliver is the author of the poem. Mr. Shaw war the poem was written, he was on a visit to Mr. Oliver, and the latter, while turning over some of er you may see fit. Let me congratulate you, Mr. Oliver, on being the son of the genius who created n were crowding as he wrote. Such a man was Mr. Oliver. * * * * Mr. Oliver, both by natural gifts aMr. Oliver, both by natural gifts and careful culture, was fully equal to such a production. * * * * From Mr. Oliver's well-known modes --written by my girlishly modest friend, Thaddeus Oliver, of the Buena Vista guards. I should likthat this beautiful poem was written by Mr. Thaddeus Oliver, of the Second Georgia regiment, who wa[4 more...]
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 2: poets of the Civil War I (search)
l in battle. Bull Run, theme of many exultant Southern ballads and satires, See also Book III, Chap. III. brought from Boker the impassioned Upon the Hill before Centreville. In the controversy with England which followed the seizure of Mason and Slidell, Lowell wrote his spirited and determined Jonathan to John, second in the new series of Biglow papers. During September, 1861, Mrs. Ethelinda, (Ethel Lynn) Beers wrote The Picket-Guard (attributed in the South to Lamar Fontaine or Thaddeus Oliver), a widely popular piece expressing sympathy with the minor and unnoted victims of the conflict. Also popular was the anonymous Tardy George, that is, General McClellan, of whom the North demanded more activity than he ever attained. In the same cause, though without the mention of names, was Wanted—A Man, by Stedman, who shortly after had to write another elegy, Kearny at seven pines, upon the gallant officer commemorated by Boker in the Dirge for a soldier. Thomas Dunn English's T
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 3: poets of the Civil War II (search)
without work there is not the remotest chance for an enduring reputation, and at the same time makes the same suggestion to others who may have acquired a reverence for inspiration so called, and a contempt for the art of versification. Apart from his critical judgment Davidson shows the ability of a careful editor in weighing evidence as to the authorship of All quiet along the Potomac—a poem that all Southerners had claimed as the work of Lamar Fontaine. Now by some ascribed to Thaddeus Oliver (1826-64). Davidson publishes Fontaine's letter claiming positively the authorship, but side by side with it is one from Joel Chandler Harris, who was at that time, according to the editor, planning an edition of Southern poems, and who after much deliberation expresses the opinion that Mrs. Beers is the author of the poem. He quotes also a letter to the same effect from the editor of Harper's magazine. While he himself does not express an opinion, it is not difficult for the reader t
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
Odd Miss Todd, 373 Ode on the Confederate dead, 301, 303, 304, 309-310 Ode recited at the Harvard Commemoration, 286, 287 Ogden vs. Saunders, 93 n. O'Hara, Theodore, 290, 311 O. Henry. See Porter, William Sydney Old black Joe, 353 Old Chester tales, 390 Old Creole days, 384 Old-Fashioned Girl, An, 402 Old Folks at home, 353 Old Ironsides, 226, 237 Oldmixon, John, 107 Old Sergeant, the, 281 Old times, old friends, old Loves, 243 Old Uncle Ned, 353 Oliver, Thaddeus, 280, 303 n. Oliver Oldschool. See Dennie, Joseph Oliver Optic. See Adams, W. T. Ollapodiana papers, 152 Olmsted, F. L., 190 Omnium gatherum, the, 162 On a certain condescension in foreigners, 255 On Board the Cumberland, 278, 282 Once I Pass'd through a Populous city, 258 n. On Lending a Punch Bowl, 239 On the argument from nature for the Divine existence, 221 On to Richmond, 305 One, two, three, 244 Only a private, 306 Opal, the, 174 O'Reilly, J
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 6: (search)
Bower, (D) R. Duvall, (H) A. P. Newhart, (K) S. L. Turner. (See also Eighth Georgia cavalry regiment and Fifteenth Georgia battalion of cavalry.) The Sixty-third regiment Georgia volunteers was mustered in with the following officers: Col. George A. Gordon, Lieut.-Col. George R. Black, Maj. John R. Giles, Commissary G. W. Lamar, Asst. Quartermaster C. J. White, Adjt. J. S. Hammond. The captains were: (A) J. V. H. Allen, (B) James T. Buckner, (C) E. J. Craven, (D) E. H. Harrison, (E) Thad. Oliver, (F) John H. Losser, (G) D. N. Martin, (H) H. H. Scranton, (I) C. W. Howard, (K) William J. Dixon. Captain Allen soon became major. This regiment was formed in December, 1862, in the following manner: The Oglethorpe artillery, which had been the Oglethorpe infantry, Company D, of Ramsey's First Georgia, was detached from the Twelfth Georgia battalion of artillery (acting as infantry and stationed at Jacksboro, Tenn.), and being ordered to Savannah was united with the Thirteenth infantry