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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for John M. Oliver or search for John M. Oliver in all documents.

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ile Station and returned, skirmishing all the way. This brigade skirmished considerably with the enemy near night. Colonel Oliver's brigade, of Hazen's division, made the reconnnoissance to Jenks's Bridge, but found the bridge destroyed. I sent anks's Bridge. the Chief-Engineer, Captain C. B. Reese, finding the enemy on the other bank, threw over a regiment of Colonel Oliver's brigade and cleared the way. The bridge was immediately laid. General Corse's division had arrived by this time; o brigade, from Wright's Bridge, at Eden Station. General Hazen's division moved on to Black Creek, sending forward Colonel Oliver's brigade to the Cannoucher. The rest of the corps were encamped near Jenks's Bridge. The Seventeenth corps encampettle of July twenty-second, 1864, before Atlanta. I recommend the following officers for Brigadier-Generals: Colonel J. M. Oliver, Fifteenth Michigan volunteer infantry, for long and faithful services, for special gallantry at Fort McAllister,
's Bridge) with a view to saving them, if possible. Colonel Williamson's brigade of General Woods's division reached the former in time to save much of the timber, but all the planking and several of the trestles were already burned. He, however, constructed a foot-bridge and crossed over a small force which he pushed forward toward the railroad. A small detachment went as far as the Twenty-Mile Station and returned, skirmishing all the way. This brigade skirmished considerably with the enemy near night. Colonel Oliver's brigade, of Hazen's division, made the reconnnoissance to Jenks's Bridge, but found the bridge destroyed. I sent an officer, Lieutenant Harney, with a select party to strike the Gulf Railroad, but he found the bridge across the Cannoucher burned and the approaches were guarded by rebels, so that he was compelled to return without doing the work. Another party also sent to try for a point higher up the Cannoucher for the same purpose, was not yet heard from.
ed the foot-bridge and marched down the east bank of the Ogeechee toward Eden Station. On the arrival of the pontoon at Jenks's Bridge. the Chief-Engineer, Captain C. B. Reese, finding the enemy on the other bank, threw over a regiment of Colonel Oliver's brigade and cleared the way. The bridge was immediately laid. General Corse's division had arrived by this time; one brigade, General Rice commanding, crossed over, met the enemy's skirmishers some five hundred yards beyond, drove them in,prisoners, and killing and wounding several more. We lost two killed and two or three wounded. This brigade then formed a junction with General Woods's brigade, from Wright's Bridge, at Eden Station. General Hazen's division moved on to Black Creek, sending forward Colonel Oliver's brigade to the Cannoucher. The rest of the corps were encamped near Jenks's Bridge. The Seventeenth corps encamped in the vicinity of Station No. 3, ceasing to destroy the railroad after leaving Ogeechee Church.
d breaking up railroad, till the thirteenth, when it moved across Turner's Ferry, and to Whitehall, two miles west of Atlanta. On the fifteenth of November, every preparation being completed, this division, with the army, broke camp at Atlanta and set out upon its march through Georgia. It then numbered an effective strength of four thousand four hundred and twenty-six officers and men, and was composed of seventeen regimental organizations. Its three brigade commanders being, Colonels John M. Oliver, Fifteenth Michigan; Wells S. Jones, Fifty-third Ohio; and Theodore Jones, Thirtieth Ohio. The troops moved rapidly, passing through McDonough the seventeenth, Indian Springs the eighteenth, crossing the Ocmulgee the nineteenth, at Roach's Mills, reaching Hillsboro the twentieth, and Clinton the twenty-first, where Colonel Theodore Jones's brigade was left to cover the Macon roads till the next division arrived. Some skirmishing took place here, with a few casualties. On the
is due to the intelligence, experience, and coolness of Acting Chief-Engineer Ramsey. His efforts were ably seconded by his assistants Tynan, Campbell, Herring, Jack, and White. As Mr. Ramsey is only Acting Chief-Engineer, I respectfully recommend his promotion to the rank of Chief; and would also ask that second Assistant Engineer Campbell may be promoted to First Assistant — he having performed the duties of that grade during the engagement. The forward officers, boatswain Hasker, gunner Oliver, and carpenter Lindsey, discharged well all the duties required of them. The boat-swain had charge of a gun, and fought it well. The gunner was indefatigable in his efforts; his experience and exertions as a gunner have contributed very materially to the efficiency of the battery. Acting Master Parrish was assisted in piloting the ship by pilots Wright, Williams, Clark, and Cunningham. They were necessarily much exposed. It is now due that I should mention my personal staff. To