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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 4 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 13: England.—June, 1838, to March, 1839.—Age, 27-28. (search)
its to this country,—when I know that my husband, Lord Monteagle, saw him frequently,—I had not so much personal intercourse with him, excepting in the large meetings of London general society. I am sorry that I cannot supply any more definite information respecting a distinguished man whose society was so much prized in this country. Mrs. Grote writes: My recollections of Charles Sumner when he first came amongst us are still fresh and lively. We first met him at the house of William Ord, M. P., and after that at Mr. Senior's, and other places. His company was sought and valued by several families of the English nobility and gentry, with whom he became a favorite guest; and I may safely affirm that no visitor from the United States ever received more flattering attention than Mr. Sumner from both English and Scottish houses. His extensive knowledge, polished manners, and genial cast of character recommended him to all circles of society; and deep was the sympathy inspi
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
ning with Edward Romilly 1804-1870. (the son of Sir Samuel): there were only Lord Lansdowne, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, Mr. Hallam, Mr. Wickham, Mrs. Marcet, and myself; and the conversation turned upon this book. To-night I dined with Mr. Ord, William Ord. an old stager in Parliament, who fought under the leadership of Fox. To-morrow Parliament meets. Through the kind interference of Lord Morpeth, I am to have a place to hear the Queen's speech; and the Speaker has given me thWilliam Ord. an old stager in Parliament, who fought under the leadership of Fox. To-morrow Parliament meets. Through the kind interference of Lord Morpeth, I am to have a place to hear the Queen's speech; and the Speaker has given me the entree of the House of Commons at all times. Lord Brougham has given me his full-bottom Lord-Chancellor's wig, For many years kept at the Harvard Law School. in which he made his great speech on the Reform Bill. Such a wig costs twelve guineas; and then, the associations of it! In America it will be like Rabelais' gown. Ever yours, C. S. To George S. Hillard. travellers', Feb. 16, 1839. dear Hillard,—Perhaps this is my last greeting from London; and yet it is hard to tear my