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Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz) 34 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 26 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz). You can also browse the collection for Edward Otho Cresap Ord or search for Edward Otho Cresap Ord in all documents.

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Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), IV. Cold Harbor (search)
ding orders. Grant is very desirous always of seeing, and quite regardless of his own exposure. 10.30 A. M. Burnside and Ord came in. The former, much flushed, walked up to General Meade and used extremely insubordinate language. He afterwards said he could advance, and wished of all things to persist; but could not show how he would do it! Ord was opposed to further attempts. Meade ordered the attack suspended. As Ord and Burnside passed me, the latter said something like: You have 15,0Ord and Burnside passed me, the latter said something like: You have 15,000 men concentrated on one point. It is strange if you cannot do something with them. Ord replied angrily, flourishing his arms: You can fight if you have an opportunity; but, if you are held by the throat, how can you do anything? Meaning, I supOrd replied angrily, flourishing his arms: You can fight if you have an opportunity; but, if you are held by the throat, how can you do anything? Meaning, I suppose, that things were so placed that troops could not be used. Burnside said to one of his Staff officers: Well, tell them to connect, and hold it. Which was easy to say, but they seem to have had no provision of tools, and, at any rate, did not
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 7 (search)
e's indignation by its exposure. Now they have partly sunk it and partly built a bank, on the enemy's side, so that it is covered from fire. Here we got news that Ord and Birney had crossed the James, the first near Dutch Gap, the other near Deep Bottom, and advanced towards Richmond. Birney went up the New-market road, took a line of works, and joined Ord, who took a strong line, with a fort, on Chapin's farm, which is before Chapin's bluff, which again is opposite Fort Darling. We got sixteen guns, including three of heavy calibre, also some prisoners. General Ord was shot in the thick of the leg, above the knee. There was another line, on the crest General Ord was shot in the thick of the leg, above the knee. There was another line, on the crest beyond, which I do not think we attacked at all. We went down then to the Jones house, where were Parke's Headquarters, and talked with him. I saw there Charlie Mills, now on his Staff. Finally, at 1.30 we got to Globe Tavern where was the astute Warren. Everything was set, as he would say, for an advance by Griffin's and Ayres's
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 8 (search)
ool his passions till next morning in the guardhouse, when he was paid off. November 12, 1864 We have the usual play of rumor about cabinets — everybody seems inclined to heave out Stanton: some to heave him up to the Supreme Court--some to heave him down to unknown depths of nothingness. Many would fain fancy Ben Butler in the chair of War, where he would be certain to make things spin either for good or for bad. How he will get on, across the James, I know not. He lost a strong man in Ord, wounded; and in Birney, dead, also: Birney was one who had many enemies, but, in my belief, we had few officers who could command 10,000 men as well as he. He was a pale, Puritanical figure, with a demeanor of unmovable coldness; only he would smile politely when you spoke to him. He was spare in person, with a thin face, light-blue eye, and sandy hair. As a General he took very good care of his Staff and saw they got due promotion. He was a man, too, who looked out for his own interests s
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 9 (search)
the distinguished militaries crowded round to gaze. Major-General Ord, who can't get over his Irish blood, said: I believe, tell you. Generals Meade, Warren, Wright, Parke, Humphreys, Ord, Gibbon, Ayres, Griffin, Rawlins, Ingalls, etc., etc. Very from the river to west of the Jerusalem road; then Wright and Ord, stretching to Hatcher's Run; then Humphreys, forming the le Humphreys' left rested somewhat west of the Boydton plank. Ord and Humphreys were now crowding in their skirmishers, trying for openings in the slashings to put in a column. Ord tried to carry the line, but could not get through; but the 2d divisiquick towards their own right, having abandoned the whole of Ord's front and some of Humphreys'. We were not quite sure whethlooking young man? He was sent the day before yesterday, by Ord, from Burkeville Junction, with a small infantry and cavalry officer speedily, with a note. General Lee stated that General Ord had agreed to a suspension of hostilities, and he should
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), Index (search)
74; troops, 102, 162, 180, 256, 262; aunty, 183; Petersburg mine, 199, 214; burying Rebel dead, 203n; arming southern, 245; poker game, 269. Nesmith, James Willis, 280; on Bull Run, 284. New London, Conn., 223. Newspapers, errors of, 100. Newton, John, 33, 56, 60, 80; visited, 9. Newton, Mrs., 131. North Anna, 122, 126. O'Connor, W. Ulick, Viscount Castle-Cuffe, 49. Officers, good quality, 11; promotion, 78; qualities of good, 121, 266; bearing of Rebel, 152. Ord, Edward Otho Cresap, 200, 233, 266, 320, 335, 357. Ordinary, in Virginia, 119. Otto, William Tod, 212. Ovens, Dutch, 351. Palfrey, Francis Winthrop, 65. Parke, John Grubb, 233, 234, 236, 323, 334; described, 213; engineer, 246. Parker, Isaac Brown, 288. Parker, Theodore, 260. Patrick, Marsena Rudolph, 74. Patten, Henry Lyman, 208. Pease, Charles Elliott, 358. Peeble house, 235, 254, 321. Peel, Cecil Lennox, captain, 49. Pell, Duncan Archibald, 212, 312, 319. Pemberton, John Clifford