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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 6 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 2 0 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 2 0 Browse Search
the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 5, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 7.48 (search)
alone in the whole field of literature. Although a Whig in politics, he was a High Churchman, and had high notions of governmental prerogatives; but a long residence in Virginia, and the identity of his interests with those of the Virginians, appear to have greatly changed his views of governmental authority and popular rights. During the year 1724 Governor Spotswood married Ann Butler, daughter of Richard Bryan, Esq., of Westminster. She derived her middle name from James Butler, Duke of Ormond, her relative and godfather. The Governor now resided at Germana. It was here that Colonel William Byrd, of Westover, visited the Governor in 1732. I give the following extract from Colonel Byrd's journal: September 27.--Here I arrived about 3 o'clock, and found only Mrs. Spotswood at home, who received her old acquaintance with many a gracious smile. I was carried into a room elegantly set off with pier glasses, the largest of which came soon after to an odd misfortune. Amongst oth
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 6: fiction I — Brown, Cooper. (search)
harlotte Temple. Hugh Henry Brackenridge. modern Chivalry. Charles Brockden Brown. Alcuin. Arthur Mervyn. Wieland. Ormond. Brown's indebtedness to Godwin. Edgar Huntly. Isaac Mitchell. Tabitha Tenney. Samuel Woodworth. James Fenimore Coon, behaves much as did the Dr. Smith of reality, but invention was before fact. And when, in December, 1798, Brown wrote Ormond (1799), he not only laid his scene in Philadelphia in 1793, but he borrowed a whole chapter from The man at home. What tirtue in distress, and his favourite set of characters, a patron and a client. Perhaps he comes nearest to his master in Ormond. Constantia Dudley won the passionate regard of Shelley, to whom she was the type of virtuous humanity oppressed by evil customs. She is Brown's picture of feminine perfection, learned, self-reliant, pure, priggish. Ormond is quite clearly the child of romance and revolution, a hero who is a villain, a creature of nature who is the master of many destinies, a free wi
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
On the human understanding, 57 On the nature, extent and perfection of the divine Goodness, 79 On the prospect of planting Arts and learning in America, 214 On the rise and progress of the differences between great Britain and her American colonies, 140 On the Sleep of plants, 183 One-Hoss Shay, the, 65 Optimist, the, 244 Oralloosa, 222, 225 Original journals (of Lewis and Clark), 205 Original poems (Fessenden), 180 Original poems, serious and entertaining, 180 Ormond, 290 Ornithology (Wilson), 180 Orphan, the, 117 Orphic Sayings, 341 Osawattomie Brown, 227 Ossian, 177 Ossoli, Marquis, 343 Othello, 225 Otis, James, 30 Otis, James, Jr., 125,126, 127, 128, 129, Otway, 116, 117 Ouabi, or the virtues of nature, 178 Over-soul, the, 336, 352 Ovid, 16 Owen, Robert, 339 Owen, Robert Dale, 225 P Paine, Robert Treat, Jr., 178-179 Paine, Thomas, 74, 77, 91, 99, 102, 123, 140 1, 142, 4, 144, 67 Pamela, 64, 284 Pam
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Chapter 3: the Philadelphia period (search)
was himself the editor of the Llonthly magazine and American Review (1799), and the Literary magazine and American Register (1803-8). His first published work, The dialogue of Alcuin (1797), dealt with questions of marriage and divorce, and he was also the author of several essays on political, historical, and geographical subjects. His novels followed each other with astonishing rapidity: Sky Walk; or the man unknown to himself (1798, not published), Wieland; or the Transformation (1798), Ormond ; or the secret witness (1799), Arthur Mervyn ; or Mlemoirs of the year 1793 (1799-1800), Edgar Huntly; or memoirs of a sleep Walker (1801), Jane Talbot (1801), and Clara Howard; or the enthusiasm of love (1801). When, thirty years later, in 1834, the historian Jared Sparks undertook the publication of a Library of American biography, he included in the very first volumewith a literary instinct most creditable to one so absorbed in the severer tasks of history -a memoir of Charles Brockd
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, A Glossary of Important Contributors to American Literature (search)
ost famous story, Peter Rugg, the Missing man, originally contributed to the New England Galaxy (1824-26), of which he was editor. Died in Charlestown, Mass., June 27, 1841. Brown, Charles Brockden Born in Philadelphia, Jan. 17, 1771, of Quaker parents. He was really the first American to make a profession of literature. He first undertook the study of law, and it was not till 1798 that Wieland, his first romance, was published. The rest of his works followed in quick succession: Ormond in 1799; Arthur Mervyn, Part I in 1798, Part II in 1800; Edgar Huntley in 1799; Clara Howard in 1801 ; and Jane Talbot in 1704. In the mean time he had become an editor, having in charge between 1799 and 1808 The monthly magazine and American Review (New York) and The literary magazine and American Register (Philadelphia). He wrote also Alcuin, a dialogue on the rights of women (1797); several political pamphlets ; a General Geography; and a treatise on Rome during the age of the Antonines.
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Index. (search)
ker, Greeley's, 95. New York Literati, Poe's, 209. New York Mirror, 105. Notes a mbrosianse, 157. Norris, Frank, 254, 256. North, Christopher, 157, 164. North, Lord, 60. North American Review, 132. North Church, Boston, 16. Norton, Andrews, 10. Norton, Hon. Mrs., 123. O'Connor's child, Campbell's, 36. Ode to light, Schiller's, 280. Ode to sleep, Trumbull's, 40. Odyssey, Bryant's, 104. Old Manse, 184. Old Sergeant, Willson's, 264. Oratory, printed, 41-45. Ormond, Brown's, 70. Orpheus C. Kerr, 243. Ossoli, Margaret Fuller, 179, 180, 232. Outre-Mer, Longfellow's, 140. Ovid, 8. Paine, Thomas, 54, 55. Palfrey, John Gorham, 117. Paracelsus, Browning's, 262. Paradise lost, Milton's, 15. Parker, Theodore, 176, 178, 179, 233, 270. Parkman, Francis, 98, 118-121. Peter, 239. Parton, James, 119. Pater, Walter, 166. Pathfinder, Cooper's, 99. Pendennis, Thackeray's, 258. Penn, William, 74, 147. Pepper, Colonel, 235. Perkins, El
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, Mrs. Frances Anne Kemble. (search)
, residing in a spacious mansion in Philadelphia. Pierce Butler was his name. He was a descendant of the famous Pierce Butler of South Carolina, whose history was so familiar to the public seventy years ago, but has long since been forgotten. Major Pierce Butler came to America before the Revolutionary war with one of the regiments sent over by the tory government to overawe rebellious Boston. He was an Irishman by descent, a scion of the ancient family, the head of which was the Duke of Ormond. Instead of assisting an obstinate and ignorant king to subdue the most loyal of his subjects, he had the good sense to embrace their cause. He resigned his commission, sold his property in Great Britain, and settled in South Carolina, where he purchased a very large estate in lands suited to the culture of rice and cotton. There he lived and flourished, a leading planter and politician, from about the year 1780 until the time of his death in 1822. lie was a democrat of the most decided
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
mer, turned in the main to the Hegelian idealism introduced at Harvard in 1869 by C. C. Everett. At Princeton James McCosh, the leader of the Scottish school, poured forth an interminable list of books defending common-sense realism and attacking without excessive refinements all its opponents, including the Hegelians with their thinking in trinities. But most of his attention had to be devoted to rendering the new evolutionary philosophy harmless to the cause of orthodoxy. His successor, Ormond, so expanded the realism of his master with Berkeleian and Kantian elements as to make it lose its historic identity. A similar development took place at Yale. Noah Porter had studied in Germany under Trendelenburg, and his great textbook on The human mind (1868) showed a painstaking, if not a penetrating, knowledge of Herbart, Lotze, and Wundt as well as of the British empiricists. But he remained substantially an adherent of a Scottish intuitive philosophy. Like McCosh, but with greate
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
Polar Sea, the, 167 Opinions on various subjects dedicated to the industrious Producers, 436 Opportunity, 58 Orations and addresses (Curtis), 488 Orbis Pictus, 391 Oregon Missions and travels over the Rocky Mountains in 1845–;46, 138 Oregon plan, 365 Oregon Trail, the, 135 Or et Fange, 593 Origin and history of the English language, the, 473 Origin and progress of the patrons of Husbandry, 356 Origin of species, 229 Origin of the Fremont Explorations, 152 Ormond, 240 Orphic sayings, 532 Oscillations and Nutations of Philological Studies, The, 466 Osherowitz, M.. 606 Ossian, 518, 595 Osthoff, 469 Othello, 483 Other girl, the, 283 Otis, James, 445 Our American Cousin, 275 Our burden and our strength, 439 Our land and land policy, 441 Our master, 500 Outlet, the, 161 Outline of lectures upon political economy, 442 Outline of political economy (Jennison), 434 Outline of the system of education at New Lanark, Scot
James Russell Lowell, Among my books, Spenser (search)
ose importunate trifles which we gravely call the realities of life. In the warm Mediterranean of his mind everything Suffers a sea-change Into something rich and strange. He lifts everything, not beyond recognition, but to an ideal distance where no mortal, I had almost said human, fleck is visible. Instead of the ordinary bridal gifts, he hallows his wife with an Epithalamion fit for a conscious goddess, and the savage soil This phrase occurs in the sonnet addressed to the Earl of Ormond and in that to Lord Grey de Wilton in the series prefixed to the Faery Queen. These sonnets are of a much stronger build than the Amoretti, and some of them (especially that to Sir John Norris) recall the firm tread of Milton's, though differing in structure. of Ireland becomes a turf of Arcady under her feet, where the merchants' daughters of the town are no more at home than the angels and the fair shapes of pagan mythology whom they meet there. He seems to have had a common-sense side t
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