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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 22 2 Browse Search
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nels Lucas, Link, Mahan, Korff, Landrum, Oden, Munday, McMillan, Majors Kempton, Orr, Morrison, Captain Baird, Lieut. Lamphere, and Sergeant Brown, of the battery, gont blazed a line of fire, which was answered back from ours. Lucas, Wolfe, and Orr, on their wounded horses, inspired the men by their heroic words and examples; Ge down by the flying, Where mingle war's rattle with groans of the dying. Major Orr told me we were surrounded — the enemy in our rear — we were overwhelmed — su drawn up in line, cutting off all retreat. Gen. Manson, with Col. Lucas and Major Orr, tore down the fence, thinking they could get to the enemy's rear. Myself uisiana; Colonel Penn, Captains Frank Clark and O'Connor, and Lieutenants Smith, Orr and Martin, of the Sixth Louisiana; Captains Herrin, Morgan and Harper, and Lieuassisted in the field by Captain N. A. Holsen, Acting Lieut.-Colonel, and Capt. Jackson Orr, Acting Major, also Wm. Manning, Adjutant, who acted throughout with grea<
ng the second and third engagements. Colonels Lucas, Link, Mahan, Korff, Landrum, Oden, Munday, McMillan, Majors Kempton, Orr, Morrison, Captain Baird, Lieut. Lamphere, and Sergeant Brown, of the battery, greatly distinguished themselves during theright onward they came; along the whole front blazed a line of fire, which was answered back from ours. Lucas, Wolfe, and Orr, on their wounded horses, inspired the men by their heroic words and examples; Gen. Nelson, waving his hat and shouting: Bed the lines: In the last battle, borne down by the flying, Where mingle war's rattle with groans of the dying. Major Orr told me we were surrounded — the enemy in our rear — we were overwhelmed — surrounded — lost! Still from behind came toofs. Soon we came upon the rebel cavalry drawn up in line, cutting off all retreat. Gen. Manson, with Col. Lucas and Major Orr, tore down the fence, thinking they could get to the enemy's rear. Myself with others followed. It was a ride for
lfred Cumming, of the Tenth Georgia; Major Tracy, badly, and Captain Watson, of the Sixth Georgia; Lieutenant-Colonel Sloan, of the Fifty-third Georgia; Colonel Jones, of the Twenty-second Georgia; Lieutenant-Colonel Crowder, badly, of the Thirty-first Georgia; Major Lewis, Captains Harney and St. Martin, and Lieutenants Murphy, Cook, Current, Dea, Montgomery, Bryant, Wren, Birdsall, and McJimsey, of the Eighth Louisiana; Colonel Penn, Captains Frank Clark and O'Connor, and Lieutenants Smith, Orr and Martin, of the Sixth Louisiana; Captains Herrin, Morgan and Harper, and Lieutenants Knox, Tarpey, Flower, Talbot, and Wells, of the Seventh Louisiana; Major Menger, Captain Hart and Lieut. Patterson, of the Fifth Louisiana; Colonel Hately, Lieutenant-Colonel T. B. Lamar, Sergeant-Major Anderson, of the Fifth Florida; Captain Gregory, and privates Hagin, Henry, Bryant, Parker, Strickland, Bateman, Yon, Barnett, Dillard and Martin, of company H, of the same regiment; S. B. Barnwell, Color-S
fth Wisconsin and Powell's regular batteries; passing to the rear in line of battle, I halted at a position between these batteries. I then marched forward and occupied the same ground from which I had retired during the action. The casualties in the regiment were six men wounded on the first day, and one commissioned officer and thirty men wounded, and three men killed on the second day. During both days I was assisted in the field by Captain N. A. Holsen, Acting Lieut.-Colonel, and Capt. Jackson Orr, Acting Major, also Wm. Manning, Adjutant, who acted throughout with great coolness and courage, and to whom much credit is due. The line-officers, without an exception, deported themselves with the greatest gallantry, and did much to accomplish our successful movements on the field in the presence of danger. Upon the men of my command too much praise cannot be given for their endurance, courage, and strict obedience to orders, under all circumstances. Yours respectfully, Nathaniel