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sages, or did whatever else the master-spirits of the conspiracy required. Their associates and subordinates in office were of like faith and purpose; and it may fairly be assumed that at least four-fifths of all those in office in the Slave States, whether under the National or any State Government, on the 6th of November, 1860, were ardent advocates of Secession. In Missouri, Mr. Claiborne F. Jackson had been chosen Governor Election of August, 1860: C. F. Jackson (Douglas) 74,446; Sam. Orr (Bell) 66,583; Hancock Jackson (Breck.) 11,416; Gardenhire (Lincoln) 6,135. as a Douglas Democrat; but that designation was entirely delusive. Having achieved what he considered the regular Democratic nomination for Governor, he thought he could not afford to bolt the regular Democratic nomination for President, and so gave at least a nominal support to Douglas, who thus obtained the vote of Missouri in November, when Gov. J. and a large proportion of his supporters were in feeling and pur
in one hour I had the satisfaction to see the draw open. The Tyler being the slowest of the gunboats, Lieutenant Commanding Gwin landed a force to destroy a portion of the railroad-track and to secure such military stores as might be found, while I directed Lieutenant Commanding Shirk to follow me with all speed in chase of the fleeing boats. In five hours this boat succeeded in forcing the rebels to abandon and burn those of their boats loaded with military stores. The first one fired (Samuel Orr) had on board a quantity of submarine batteries, which very soon exploded. The second one was freighted with powder, cannon, shot, grape, balls, etc. Fearing an explosion from the fired boats — there were two together — I had stopped at a distance of one thousand yards; but even there our skylights were broken by the concussion, the light upper deck was raised bodily, doors were forced open, and locks and fastenings everywhere broken. The whole river, for half a mile round about, was c
isional Congress putting in operation the permanent government of the Confederate States, and the act supplemental to the same. The roll being called, the following Senators answered to their names: Arkansas--Mr. Mitchell and Mr. Johnson. Florida--Mr. Maxwell and Mr. Baker. Georgia--Mr. Hill. Kentucky--Mr. Simms. Louisiana--Mr. Sparrow. Mississippi--Mr. Brown. Missouri--Mr. Clark and Mr. Peyton. North-Carolina--Mr. Davis and Mr. Dortch. South-Carolina--Mr. Barnwell and Mr. Orr. Tennessee--Mr. Haynes and Mr. Henry. Texas--Mr. Oldham. Virginia--Mr. Hunter and Mr. Preston. Nineteen Senators being present, (a quorum,) the oath to support the Constitution was then administered — the Senators taking the oath in parties of four at a time. The Vice-President announced that the first business before the Senate was the election of a President of the Senate pro tempore. Mr. Davis, of North-Carolina, moved that the Hon. R. M. T. Hunter, of Virginia, be unanim
n one hour I had the satisfaction to see the draw open. The Taylor being the slowest of the gunboats, Lieutenant Commanding Gwen landed a force to destroy a portion of the railroad track and to secure such military stores as might be found, while I directed Lieutenant Commanding Shirk to follow me with all speed in chase of the fleeing boats. In five hours this boat succeeded in forcing the rebels to abandon and burn those of their boats loaded with military stores. The first one fired (Samuel Orr) had on board a quantity of submarine batteries, which very soon exploded. The second one was freighter with powder, cannon, shot, grape, balls, &c. Fearing an explosion from the fired boats — there were two together — I had stopped at a distance of one thousand yards; but even there our skylights were broken by the concussion, the light upper deck was raised bodily, doors were forced open, and locks and fastenings everywhere broken. The whole river, for half a mile round about, was comp