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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Petersburg and Richmond: December 31st, 1864. (search)
ol. Francis E. Pierce: 14th Conn., Lieut.-Col. Samuel A. Moore; 1st Del., Lieut.-Col. Daniel Woodall; 12th N. J., Capt. Henry F. Chew; 10th N. Y. (batt'n), Capt. Joseph La Fuira; 108th N. Y., Capt. William H. Andrews; 4th Ohio (batt'n), Lieut.-Col. Charles C. Calahan; 69th Pa., Maj. Patrick S. Tinen; 106th Pa. (batt'n). Capt. John H. Gallager; 7th W. Va., Lieut.-Col. Isaac B. Fisher. Third division, Brig.-Gen. Gershom Mott. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. P. Regis de Trobriand: 20th Ind., Maj. William Orr; 1st Me. Heavy Art'y, Col. Russell B. Shepherd; 17th Me., Capt. William Hobson; 40th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Madison M. Cannon; 73d N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Michael W. Burns; 86th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Nathan H. Vincent; 124th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Charles H. Weygant; 99th Pa., Lieut.-Col. Peter Fritz, Jr.; 110th Pa., Capt. William Stewart; 2d U. S. Sharp-shooters, Maj. James E. Doughty. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Byron R. Pierce: 1st Mass. Heavy Art'y, Maj. Nathaniel Shatswell; 5th Mich., Col. John Pul
commanding, remained in the division. While in the Fifth Corps, the regiment saw some hard fighting at the Wilderness, and, also, at the assault on Petersburg, June 18th. The enlistment of the Nineteenth expired in August, 1864, when the few remaining members of the original regiment went home. Twentieth Indiana Infantry. Ward's Brigade — Birney's Division--Third Corps. (1) Col. William L. Brown (Killed). (3) Col. William C. Taylor. (2) Col. John Wheeler (Killed). (4) Col. William Orr. companies. killed and died of wounds. died of disease, accidents, in Prison, &c. Total Enrollment. Officers. Men. Total. Officers. Men. Total. Field and Staff 3 1 4   1 1 16 Company A 1 17 18   10 10 118   B 1 17 18   11 11 137   C 2 17 19   11 11 125   D   17 17   10 10 131   E 1 18 19   9 9 126   F 1 19 20   11 11 120   G 2 22 24   12 12 165   H   19 19   18 18 180   I 2 17 19   11 11 152   K 2 22 24   9 9 133 Tota
had long been used by the Shepard Congregational society. After some alterations he opened it for worship during the same year, and gathered as its congregation about two thousand souls. In 1875 it was set off as a separate parish, with the Rev. William Orr as its resident pastor. Father Orr, assisted by two curates, Fathers Coan and Ryan, is still directing its affairs. He has added the property on Mount Auburn Street, known as the Gordon McKay estate, and erected a large school upon it.Father Orr, assisted by two curates, Fathers Coan and Ryan, is still directing its affairs. He has added the property on Mount Auburn Street, known as the Gordon McKay estate, and erected a large school upon it. He contemplates within a short time placing also upon this site a commodious new church. This parish now numbers about four thousand. The New St. John's Parish, Rindge Avenue. The rapid increase of the congregation of St. Peter's church had again made that structure too small at the time Father Flatley was appointed to be its pastor, and soon after taking charge of the parish, he began to interest his people to secure additional facilities for worship. A lot was purchased upon Rindge Av
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register, Chapter 16: ecclesiastical History. (search)
the name of St. Paul's Church. The meeting-house at the northwesterly corner of Mount Auburn and Holyoke streets, erected in 1830 by the First Church in connection with the Shepard Congregational Society, was purchased for the use of this new parish, and after being repaired and fitted for its new use, was opened for Divine service Dec. 25, 1873. Rev. Mr. Dougherty retained the pastoral charge of St. Paul's Church, as well as of St. Peter's, until Oct. 1, 1875, when he was succeeded by Rev. William Orr, the present pastor. Church of the Sacred heart.—On the fourth day of October, 1874, the corner-stone was laid of an edifice to be called the Church of the Sacred Heart, on the southerly side of Otis Street, between Sixth and Seventh streets. It is to be constructed of stone, 150 feet in length and 75 feet in width, at an estimated cost of $80,000. The church is designed to seat twelve hundred persons. The basement under the whole building is to be fitted for the use of the Sabbath
, 304, 28. Newhall, 322. Newhouse, 345. Nichols, 36, 73, 168, 327. Nicholson, 95, 103. Norris, 244, 313. Norton, 5, 69, 71 Nowanit, 391. Nowell, 6, 8, 27, 77. Noyes, 116. Nutting, 165, 6, 70, 215. Oakes, 57, 74, 5, 117, 262, 6, 9, 71-80, 2, 3, 351, 99. Obbatinewat, 382. O'Brien, 329. Oldham, 59. Oliver, 76, 124, 5, 38, 50, 1, 4-6, 68, 9, 226, 7, 74, 86, 7, 307, 10, 75, 407, 18. Olmstead, 11, 20, 1, 32, 5, 49, 463. Onge, 81. Ordway, 328. Orr, 341. Osland, 80. Otheman, 321. Otis, 186, 309. Packard, 326, 69. Paddlefoot, 59. Page, 328. Paige, 115, 316. Palfrey, 75, 114, 266, 8, 274, 363. Palmer, 292, 322, 9, 76, 425. Palsgrave, 258. Pantry, 32. Parents, 75. Parish, 35. Parker, 35, 59, 62, 75, 6, 80, 1, 177, 225, 80, 313, 27, 401. Parkes, 36, 59, 75, 81, 5. Parkman, 184. Parmele, 369. Parmenter, 239, 44. Parris, 145, 16, 398. Parsons, 185, 416. Patrick, 8, 11, 15, 32, 396