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al guns from a redoubt on the left. However, it was pushed on, and before it was brought into motion, two officers and two privates had been shot down, and before a single piece of the battery had been discharged, its cannoniers had been driven from it despite the skill and activity of my sharp-shooters in picking off the rebel gunners. Volunteers were now called for by my gallant Chief of Artillery, Major Wainwright, to man the battery now in position, when the officers and cannoniers of Osborne's battery sprang forward, and in the time I am writing, had those pieces well at work. Bramhall's battery was now brought into action under that excellent officer, on the right of Webber's, and before nine o'clock every gun in Fort Magruder was silenced, and all the troops in sight on the plain dispersed. Between the sharp-shooters and the two batteries the enemy's guns in this fort were not heard from again until late in the afternoon. One of the regiments in Brig.-Gen. Patterson's br
ear of my column coming up to the Charles City road about ten o'clock, at which point we bivouacked for the night. In this flank movement two of my batteries — Osborne's and Bramhall's — had been detached for duty in the defence of Savage's station, where they rendered efficient service. The report of Capt. Osborne is herewith Capt. Osborne is herewith forwarded, to which the attention of the Major-General commanding the corps is especially invited. About daylight the following morning, thirtieth ult., the Major-General commanding the corps communicated to me in person that it was his desire that my division should cover what is called the Quaker road, over which our troops, ahave since been received by his regiment. I respectfully forward herewith the reports of brigade and regimental commanders. Also the report of the services of Osborne's battery at Malvern Hill. From these, it will appear that my division has again given me cause to be profoundly grateful for their conduct and courage. As Co
endale, our march was continued to the Malvern Hills, without interruption, and about ten o'clock A. M. my division was established in line of battle for the defence of our new position. Under a heavy fire of the enemy's artillery, Grover's brigade was strongly posted on the right, Carr's on the left, and well sheltered; subsequently, Sickles's brigade, held in reserve, was posted in rear of my right, protected from the enemy's shots, and well in hand to reinforce any part of my line. Osborne's and Bram's batteries occupied higher ground, where they could reply to the enemy's artillery, or open his columns of infantry should he attempt to advance. Webber's and Bramhall's batteries were located in rear of those, and held in reserve. During the remaining part of the forenoon, a brisk fire was kept up between the artillery, principally on the part of the enemy, without any decided effect, so far as could be discovered on either side, the distance being about fifteen hundred yar
d Gap, with some Government horses. These men dismounted, hitched their horses, and did excellent service. I do not know the names of any of the accomplished officers who commanded this detachment, or I should gladly give them a place in this report. I cannot close my report without referring, especially, to the gallant acts of some of the officers which came directly under my own observvation. Captain R. C. Kise, my Assistant Adjutant-General; Captain Biddle, United States Army; Lieutenant Osborne, of the Fifty-fifth Indiana; Colonel Metcalfe; Mr. William Goodloe, of Lexington, Kentucky; Mr. Bennett, of Madison county; and one or two other citizens, whose names I do not remember, who composed my staff on the day of the battles, who are entitled to great credit for the services which they rendered me, and for the prompt manner in which they discharged their duty, regardless of personal danger. I am particularly under obligations to Captain Biddle for valuable suggestions in rela
d Gap, with some Government horses. These men dismounted, hitched their horses, and did excellent service. I do not know the names of any of the accomplished officers who commanded this detachment, or I should gladly give them a place in this report. I cannot close my report without referring, especially, to the gallant acts of some of the officers which came directly under my own observvation. Captain R. C. Kise, my Assistant Adjutant-General; Captain Biddle, United States Army; Lieutenant Osborne, of the Fifty-fifth Indiana; Colonel Metcalfe; Mr. William Goodloe, of Lexington, Kentucky; Mr. Bennett, of Madison county; and one or two other citizens, whose names I do not remember, who composed my staff on the day of the battles, who are entitled to great credit for the services which they rendered me, and for the prompt manner in which they discharged their duty, regardless of personal danger. I am particularly under obligations to Captain Biddle for valuable suggestions in rela