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Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 84 2 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 52 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 41 29 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 21 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 19 15 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 17 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 11 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 8 0 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 7 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 6 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Osterhaus or search for Osterhaus in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 28: passage of the fleet by Vicksburg and capture of Grand Gulf.--capture of Alexandria, etc. (search)
eir brutal master, who had become so debased that he scarcely bore resemblance to a man. When the day broke after the arrival of the squadron at Carthage, some four hundred men, the advance guard of McClernand's division, were found behind intrenchments hastily thrown up with a log on a pair of cart-wheels, to represent a field piece, while less than a thousand yards infront of them was a formidable looking set of earth-works with four large guns in position; and Generals McClernand and Osterhaus were momentarily expecting an attack. Lieut.-Commander (now Captain) James A. Greer, commanding Flag-ship Benton. The enemy's works appeared to be full of men, and as the Union troops had been under arms all night, the arrival of the gun-boats was a great relief to them. The Tuscumbia was sent down to shell the enemy out, but the latter scampered off as soon as they saw the gun-boat coming. The Confederates had been playing a bluff game with McClernand, and held him in check until