hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 84 2 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 52 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 41 29 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 21 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 19 15 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 17 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 11 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 8 0 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 7 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 6 4 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Osterhaus or search for Osterhaus in all documents.

Your search returned 35 results in 2 document sections:

ance of cavalry and light artillery, under Col. Osterhaus, with orders to attack and break what I suhe centre was gallantly carried forward by Col. Osterhaus, who was immediately sustained and superseus in the rear. In order to prevent this, Col. Osterhaus was ordered, with some cavalry and artilles, were ordered to support this movement. Col. Osterhaus advanced about a mile beyond Leetown, and el soon arrived himself, and, accompanied by Osterhaus's command, moved in the direction of Carr's olding the most important position — while Col. Osterhaus, cooperating with the Third division, batt the way. About three miles from the camp, Col. Osterhaus's division encountered what was supposed tThird Iowa cavalry, which then accompanied Col. Osterhaus, moved forward, to complete the clearance racted struggle ensued between McCulloch and Osterhaus. Gen. Davis was ordered up to Col. OsterhauCol. Osterhaus's assistance, and our forces thus strengthened finally routed and drove the enemy in all direction[4 more...]
ft, their left still resting on Sugar Creek, Osterhaus and the Third division in the centre, and thol. Carr, to support him. In the mean time Col. Osterhaus had attacked the enemy and divided his forpresent commanders of brigades: Cols. Dodge, Osterhaus, Vandever, White, Schaefer; Pattison and Greifth and Second Missouri, and afterward to Col. Osterhaus, to take care of the rest, which he did toavalry,) which had been sent in advance of Col. Osterhaus, and which now escorted their Lieutenant-Ced to Leesville to reenforce Cols. Davis and Osterhaus. My intention was to throw back the enemy f found in full possession of Cols. Davis and Osterhaus. As no enemy could be seen, except a small sing two hospitals of the enemy, I ordered Col. Osterhaus to follow me with the Twelfth Missouri andapt. Elbert's flying battery, to report to Col. Osterhaus, on the left, to shell and batter the enem troops of the First division, all under Colonel Osterhaus, came up and continued their march towar[11 more...]