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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 143 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 69 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 54 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 51 1 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 36 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 34 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 5 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for P. J. Osterhaus or search for P. J. Osterhaus in all documents.

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right column of the Fifteenth corps, Major-General Osterhaus commanding department headquarter tra vicinity of McDonough by three routes. General Osterhaus met the enemy's cavalry at the crossing Woods was present during the action, and General Osterhaus part of the time. I regret to say that rmit me to commend to you Generals Blair and Osterhaus, and the officers and men under them; also Gdge to a point near Irwin's Cross-Roads. General Osterhaus has sent a force to destroy the rest to rs. The movement on the right bank led; General Osterhaus in person conducted it with his First anth the King's Bridge and Savannah road. General Osterhaus effected a crossing of the Cannoucher wis. All the enemy's force was withdrawn from Osterhaus's front in the morning, except the independee enemy's works which covered Savannah. General Osterhaus with the right column, consisting of Genwish to acknowledge my obligations to Major-General Osterhaus, commanding Fifteenth corps, for his [6 more...]
November 16, 1864. The command marched to the vicinity of McDonough by three routes. General Osterhaus met the enemy's cavalry at the crossing of Cotton River. They retreated rapidly, setting fire to the bridge. Some mounted infantry that he had in advance drove them from the bridge in time to put out the fire, and save every thing but the planking. The bridge was immediately repaired, and detained the column just forty minutes. General Kilpatrick crossed the Flint River at the bridge near Jonesboro, at seven A. M. Finding the enemy had left that place, he followed him to Lovejoy, where he occupied the strong position there, having two brigades of cavalry and two pieces of artillery, and holding the old rebel works. The General charged the works with dismounted cavalry, and carried them, driving back the enemy. Subsequently, the enemy's. artillery was overtaken by another charging column, and captured. He drove the enemy beyond Bear Station, capturing over fifty prisone
November 20, 1864. The command moved on Gordon in two columns, General Kilpatrick, with his cavalry, taking the Clinton road and the river-road toward Macon. General Osterhaus, with the bridge-train, cavalry-train, etc., moved toward Clinton; General Blair, with his command, via Bluntsville. The head of the right column encamped at Clinton, and the left near Fortsville. General Kilpatrick waited at Clinton until the arrival of the head of the column at twelve M., when he moved out toward Macon, on the left Macon road. He met the enemy's cavalry about four miles from Macon, drove them in, and charged their works, defended by infantry and artillery. The head of his column got inside the works, but could not hold them. He succeeded in reaching the railroad, and destroyed about one mile of the track. The road was struck in two or three places by the cavalry, beside the above, and a train of cars burned. It rained hard during the entire night.
iles in advance of his division, to-ward Macon, having two pieces of artillery, and had thrown up rail barricades, when he was attacked by quite a large body of infantry, accompanied by some artillery-probably a battery of four guns. The assault was made with great vigor, but was met in the usual manner, and completely repulsed. The action continued for some three hours. Walcott was assisted by a regiment of cavalry on either flank. General Woods was present during the action, and General Osterhaus part of the time. I regret to say that General Walcott--than whom there is not a braver or better officer — was wounded; but I hope not seriously. The conduct of the troops, both cavalry and infantry, was highly commended by the general officers present. On my arrival at Gordon, I directed General Blair to send forward the First Alabama cavalry and General G. A. Smith's division some eight or ten miles toward the Oconee bridge, which he did; with instructions to move forward to-da
by fire, but without official sanction. Also many instances of the most inexcusable and wanton acts, such as the breaking open of trunks, taking silver plate, etc. I have taken measures to prevent it, and I believe they will be effectual. The inhabitants are generally terrified, and believe us a thousand times worse than we are. Having soldiers in the command who have been bitten by blood-hounds, permission has been given to kill them. Permit me to commend to you Generals Blair and Osterhaus, and the officers and men under them; also General Kilpatrick and his command, for their faithfulness, energy, and untiring exertions to make our march a complete success. While the pleasant weather lasted, the marches were easily made; but as soon as the rains came on, the roads became very heavy, and the poorer mules broke down. But we have found a number in the country that have more than replaced our losses. The members of my staff have given me material aid, and I hope to be able
November 26. Generals Corse and Woods, Fifteenth army corps, reached this point, between nine and ten miles from the ferry, last night. Seventeenth corps massed near the fork of the road that leads to Station fourteen. The rear of the Fifteenth corps is now crossing. General Blair has sent a division that is destroying the railroad from Oconee bridge to a point near Irwin's Cross-Roads. General Osterhaus has sent a force to destroy the rest to Station thirteen. T directed the wagon bridges across Commissioners' Creek and the three bridges across Sandy River to be destroyed; the enemy helped me them-selves by destroying the one nearest the Oconee. The country this side of the river is quite open and sandy, but there is plenty of forage thus far. Wheeler, with his main force, passed here the day before yesterday. My headquarters will remain here to-day. Respectfully, O. O. Howard, Major-General.
, over the Ogeechee, about a mile above the railroad, also to reconnoitre with one division between the Ogeechee rivers. The movement on the right bank led; General Osterhaus in person conducted it with his First and Second divisions. I accompanied General Corse, who found a good ridge road on the left bank of the Big Ogeechee.bridge. General Corse sent forward a reconnoissance which found the enemy in force at the junction of this road with the King's Bridge and Savannah road. General Osterhaus effected a crossing of the Cannoucher with a couple of brigades, as directed. The Seventeenth corps meanwhile moved up abreast of Station No. 2, having mu crossed the Little Ogeechee, and halted about eight miles from the city. King's Bridge had been burned by the rebels. All the enemy's force was withdrawn from Osterhaus's front in the morning, except the independent garrison at Fort McAllister, situated on the right bank and near the mouth of the Ogeechee. During the day that
December 10. The entire command closed in on the enemy's works which covered Savannah. General Osterhaus with the right column, consisting of General Corse's division, followed by General Hazen on the King's Bridge road, the central column, consisting of General John E. Smith's division, followed by General Woods, and the lefd placed in position; the lines were worked up closer to the enemy along the dikes; good batteries constructed for small guns, and every part of the front of General Osterhaus and General Blair thoroughly reconnoitred; light bridges were constructed and fascines made so as to span the streams and fill up the ditches; in brief, everord, and the latter are already evinced in the growing confidence of our army in a speedy and complete success. I wish to acknowledge my obligations to Major-General Osterhaus, commanding Fifteenth corps, for his great activity and energy displayed during the entire campaign. To Major-General Blair, commanding Seventeenth corps