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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 100 4 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 58 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 50 6 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 50 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 46 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 45 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 44 2 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 41 1 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 28 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 26 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Robert Ould or search for Robert Ould in all documents.

Your search returned 24 results in 5 document sections:

other short stick in the other, came out to meet us. Can you tell us, my man, where to find Judge Ould, the Exchange Commissioner? Yas. Him and ta other 'change officers is over ter the plantatid, on setting out, from a near relative of Mr. Davis--to the Rebel Secretary. In half an hour Judge Ould returned, saying: Mr. Benjamin sends you his compliments, and will be happy to see you at the a multitude of state papers. At this table sat the Secretary. He rose as we entered, and, as Judge Ould introduced us, took our hands, and said: I am glad, very glad, to meet you, gentlemen. f anything should occur in the meantime to prevent his seeing you, I will let you know through Judge Ould. Throughout this interview the manner of the Secretary was cordial; but with this cordialite. It will be useless to approach me with any other. When we went out, Mr. Benjamin called Judge Ould, who had been waiting during the whole interview--two hours--at the other end of the hall, and
he meeting is legitimate with the duties of Colonel Ould as Commissioner. If not consistent for ythis letter to the President, he authorized Colonel Ould to meet the persons named in General Grant's letter; and Colonel Ould, after seeing them, returned to Richmond and reported to the President, ito arrange for a meeting of commissioners. Colonel Ould stated that he had told them repeatedly tha On the evening of the sixteenth of July, Colonel Ould conducted these gentlemen to a hotel in Rical. After perusing the letter, I invited Colonel Ould to conduct the writers to my office; and onThey were then recommitted to the charge of Colonel Ould, with the understanding that they were to bonnected with the report previously made by Colonel Ould, left on my mind the decided impression tha office at nine o'clock in the evening, and Colonel Ould came a few moments later, with Messrs Jaqueemen were then recommitted to the charge of Colonel Ould, and left Richmond the next day. This ac[2 more...]
Doc. 29. the Exchange of prisoners. Commissioner Ould's statement. To the Relatives and Friends of Confederate Soldiers Confined in Northern Prisons: On the twenty-second of July, 1863, the Cartel of Exchange was agreed upon. The chir from you, as speedy as possible, whether this arrangement can be carried out. Respectfully, your obedient servant, Ro. Ould, Agent of Exchange. I accompanied the delivery of the letter, with a statement of the mortality which was hurrying I shall be glad if the proposition therein made is accepted by your Government. Respectfully, your obedient servant, Ro. Ould, Agent of Exchange. On the afternoon of the thirtieth August, I was notified that the flag-of-truce steamer had agaand Commissioner of Exchange. headquarters Department of Virginia and North Carolina, in the field, August--, 1864. Hon. Robert Ould, Commissioner of Exchange: sir: Your note to Major Mulford, Asssistant Agent of Exchange, under date of tenth of
fficers and men who have been longest in captivity will be first delivered, where it is practicable. I shall be happy to hear from you, as speedy as possible, whether this arrangement can be carried out. Respectfully, your obedient servant, Ro. Ould, Agent of Exchange. I accompanied the delivery of the letter, with a statement of the mortality which was hurrying so many Federal prisoners at Andersonville to the grave. On the twentieth of the same month Major Mulford returned with thrward this paper to you, in order that you may fully understand the position which is taken by the Confederate authorities. I shall be glad if the proposition therein made is accepted by your Government. Respectfully, your obedient servant, Ro. Ould, Agent of Exchange. On the afternoon of the thirtieth August, I was notified that the flag-of-truce steamer had again appeared at Varina. On the following day I sent to Major Mulford the following note, to wit: Richmond, Va., August
ches under the surface, and was very nicely adjusted to the torpedo, which could not have been in the water over twenty-four hours. The wounded and scalded men were brought on board the gunboat Mackinaw, and well cared for. At dusk a portion of the fleet dropped down the river a few miles to this place, in order to coal, and we came to anchor here in the early evening. The army steamer (flag of truce), New York, went up the river, and is probably at some point arranged upon between Commissioner Ould and Major Mulford, the exchange officers, for the transfer of the men now upon the steamer. Below our present anchorage a few miles, is a place familiarly known as the Hundreds, and there some of the army steamers are now lying. And so another evening, our second in the James, quietly follows the departing day. The sloping banks crowned with oak and beach, melt away in the darkness. We cannot see the steamers which lie only a few hundred feet from us, and friend and foe all alik