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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 6 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 12 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 11 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 3 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 1 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for E. K. Owen or search for E. K. Owen in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 3 document sections:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 25: capture of Fort Hindman or Arkansas Post. (search)
ich the gun-boats laid and informed Admiral Porter that Sherman was in position in the rear of the work, and waiting for the gun-boats to begin the attack on the fort. This could not very well be the case, but the gun-boats Louisville, Lieutenant-Commander Owen, the De Kalb, Lieutenant-Commander Walker, and the Cincinnati, Lieutenant-Commander George Bache, were ordered to go up within 400 yards, while the smaller vessels were to follow and use their howitzers as circumstances would admit. of Forts Donelson and Henry, and had entire new guns on them instead of the inferior batteries they started out with; moreover, the officers had learned that the way to fight these batteries was at close quarters. Lieutenant-Commanders Walker, Owen, Bache, Shirk, Watson, Smith, Woodworth, Breese, and the commander of the Monarch were all handsomely mentioned by Casemate no. 2 destroyed by the U. S. Gun-boat Louisville. Rear view of casemate no. 2. the admiral in his report to the Navy De
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 28: passage of the fleet by Vicksburg and capture of Grand Gulf.--capture of Alexandria, etc. (search)
were counted. The enemy had many wounded, but the number was not mentioned in the returns. Rear-Admiral Porter, in his report, speaks in the highest terms of Commander Walke, Greer, Lieutenant-Commander Murphy, Lieutenant-Commanders Shirk and Owen, Lieutenants-Commanding Hoel and Wilson, some of whom had already distinguished themselves on the upper Mississippi. The remarks on this battle of Grand Gulf by military historians show how reluctant they are to give the Navy credit. The follohe rebels and shifted about from place to place. Admiral Farragut was still at the mouth of Red River in the flag-ship Hartford, where he had remained ever since he had made the passage by Port Hudson, and Admiral Porter having left Lieutenant-Commander Owen in charge at Grand Gulf with the Louisville and Tuscumbia, proceeded down the river to meet Farragut and relieve him of the command of that part of the river. On the 3d of May, 1863, Admiral Porter reached the mouth of Red River and
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 43: operations of the Mississippi squadron, under Admiral Porter, after the Red River expedition. (search)
eat river to prey upon peaceful commerce. The Petrel more than once distinguished herself in these river expeditions, and while in the Yazoo River performed service that should be remembered. Colonel Coates, who had started out with Lieutenant-Commander Owen, as mentioned on a former occasion, to keep the Confederates from following in Sherman's rear, had, with the assistance of the Navy, occupied Yazoo City, which seemed to be an object of attack from both parties. First one side and thena point occupied by part of the 11th Illinois Volunteers, supported by a 12-pound howitzer belonging to the gun-boat Exchange. Acting-Master Thomas McElroy, of the Petrel, had been left in charge of the naval force in the Yazoo River by Lieutenant-Commander Owen. After firing the howitzer several times, it had a shell jammed in the bore which could not be removed. Mr. McElroy then ordered Acting-Master Gibson. of the Marmora, to dismount one of his rifled howitzers, mount it on a field car