hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 2 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 1 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Samuel W. Owen or search for Samuel W. Owen in all documents.

Your search returned 14 results in 6 document sections:

le which deserves particular mention. The first regiment of the enemy which came into action wore blue clothes like our men, and as they came into action opposite the Eighty-first Pennsylvania regiment, Col. Miller, they said: Do not fire; we are Owen's men. Owen's regiment is one of Birney's brigade on my left. Col. Miller had his regiment at an aim, and now recovered arms. The enemy instantly poured in a deadly volley, by which Miller was killed. The left wing of the Eighty-first poured iOwen's regiment is one of Birney's brigade on my left. Col. Miller had his regiment at an aim, and now recovered arms. The enemy instantly poured in a deadly volley, by which Miller was killed. The left wing of the Eighty-first poured in their fire, by which that regiment fell in piles. The Colonel, Lieutenant-Colonel, Major, and Adjutant all fell; the balance of the regiment fell and broke. Yours truly, I. B. Richardson, Brig.-General Commanding Division. General McClellan to his army. McClellan's headquarters, Tuesday Evening, June 3, 1862. The following address was read to the army this evening at dress-parade, and was received with an outburst of vociferous cheering from every regiment: headquarters
entre battery was fairly carried, the enemy limbering up his guns without taking them off the field. Finding our horses badly blown for a long charge over rough ground, going a distance of twelve hundred yards, and the infantry in great force, ordered all companies on the right to retreat to the right and rear, forming on the swamp road, and those on the left, to then join their command. The conduct of men and officers was in every respect commendatory. Captains Lundy and Egbert, Lieutenants Owen, Horton, Suetger, all had horses killed under them. There were about four hundred men in the charges. Our loss will scarcely exceed fifty killed and wounded; fifty horses, as many wounded and unserviceable. Edward Hatch, Lieut.-Col. Commanding Second Iowa Cavalry. Cincinnati Commercial account. camp near Farmington, Miss., May 10, 1862. Gen. Pope's little army have been chafing and edging up toward the enemy for ten days, several miles in advance of the main column. It i
was posted in an open field on my extreme right, and under shelter from the enemy's artillery. This was the Sixty-ninth regiment Pennsylvania volunteers, under Col. Owen. Meanwhile, the enemy's attack had grown in force and violence, and after an ineffectual effort to resist it, the whole of McCall's division was completely ro, and were instantly followed with great gallantry by Grover at the head of the First Massachusetts regiment, while the Sixty-ninth Pennsylvania, heroically led by Owen, advanced in the open field on their flank, with almost reckless daring. Grover was reinforced by the Second New-Hampshire and the Twenty-sixth Pennsylvania rege's battery at Malvern Hill. From these, it will appear that my division has again given me cause to be profoundly grateful for their conduct and courage. As Col. Owen has rendered me no report of the operations of his regiment, I can only express my high appreciation of his services and my acknowledgments to his Chief for havi
she was engaged with mounted thirty large guns. A lot of shot are still sticking in her below the water-line. Colonel Samuel W. Owen, with a battalion of the Third Pennsylvania cavalry,--together with a body of infantry, all under the immediate ct importance to the Government, and made every effort to save it. On Monday night, reinforcements, under command of Colonel Owen, Sixtieth Indiana, were received from Lebanon Junction, consisting of a part of the Sixtieth Indiana, (four hundred ances I regarded the order as unjust, but should obey it. In the mean time the council had been convened, consisting of Colonels Owen, Wilder, King, Emerson, and Murray, Captain Conkle, and myself. The unanimous conclusion was, that if they had the ftion, even when shell and musket-balls flew thick and fast, were invaluable, and cannot be too favorably mentioned. Colonel Owen was in command of the field-works on the left, (Fort Craig,) with discretionary authority. I need scarcely say that i
n board the Galena, a squadron of the rebel cavalry entered the small town on the opposite side of the James River at City Point, at the mouth of the Appomattox River. Two shells were thrown into the town, and the enemy skedcladled. The Galena is very much cut up by the enemy's shot. She will be obliged to go into dock before she can go into action again. The battery she was engaged with mounted thirty large guns. A lot of shot are still sticking in her below the water-line. Colonel Samuel W. Owen, with a battalion of the Third Pennsylvania cavalry,--together with a body of infantry, all under the immediate command of General Naglee, made a reconnoissance yesterday some two miles in advance of this point. They drove in the enemy's pickets, killing one. They found the enemy in force, posted with artillery. The reconnoissance accomplished, the whole party returned without accident, the enemy not deeming it proper to follow, although outnumbering the Unionists largely. The
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 121.-surrender of Munfordville, Ky. (search)
g Green. I regarded the place as of great importance to the Government, and made every effort to save it. On Monday night, reinforcements, under command of Colonel Owen, Sixtieth Indiana, were received from Lebanon Junction, consisting of a part of the Sixtieth Indiana, (four hundred and twenty men,) including one company of tlder. I replied that under the circumstances I regarded the order as unjust, but should obey it. In the mean time the council had been convened, consisting of Colonels Owen, Wilder, King, Emerson, and Murray, Captain Conkle, and myself. The unanimous conclusion was, that if they had the force claimed, namely, over twenty-five thos experience, coolness, and close observation, even when shell and musket-balls flew thick and fast, were invaluable, and cannot be too favorably mentioned. Colonel Owen was in command of the field-works on the left, (Fort Craig,) with discretionary authority. I need scarcely say that it was a trust worthily confided. I sho