hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 12 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Comments on the First volume of Count of Paris' civil War in America. (search)
l Confederate States army. *Wm. B. Royall, Major Fifth Cavalry, Colonel by brevet, United States army. Second Lieutenants-- George B. Cosby, Brigadier-General Confederate States army. William W. Lowe, Brigadier-General Volunteers, United States army. John B. Hood, General Confederate States army. *Junius B. Wheeler, Major Engineers and Professor of Engineering and the Science of War at West Point. †A. Parker Porter, Lieutenant-Colonel of staff, United States army. †Wesley Owens, Lieutenant-Colonel of staff, United States army. †James P. Major, Brigadier-General Confederate States army. †Fitzhugh Lee, Major-General Confederate States army. (Those marked with * taken from civil life — with † graduates of West Point 1855 and 1856--with ‡ formerly in the army, but taken from civil life; all the others taken from the army.) These two regiments, from the appointments made during Mr. Davis' administration of the War Department, furnished to the Unit
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoranda of the operations of Brigadier-General W. H. F. Lee's command during General Stoneman's raid into Virginia. (search)
n up in road; one squadron of Ninth cavalry was ahead, a few hundred yards; charged; enemy charged at same time; fought hand to hand four or five minutes; routed the party; killed six; wounded a number; took thirty-three prisoners, among them Captain Owens and Lieutenant Buford. Captain Owens reported that his regiment was not all present, but that he was on picket; that General Buford was only three miles distant. My horses and men being jaded, and having only about eigth hundred men, I determCaptain Owens reported that his regiment was not all present, but that he was on picket; that General Buford was only three miles distant. My horses and men being jaded, and having only about eigth hundred men, I determined not to pursue; continued back to Gordonsville, having traveled seventy or eighty miles. Tuesday, 5th--Rested, having sent out scouting parties; heard by telegram from Richmond that the enemy were everywhere. Wednesday, 6th--Having received information that the enemy were recrossing the railroad, moved down upon his left flank; came upon his rear at North Anna river; took seventeen or eighteen prisoners; their rear guard had crossed the river and torn up the bridge. It had been raini
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Chancellorsville--report of General R. E. Lee. (search)
Stuart crossed the Rapidan at Raccoon ford, with Fitz. Lee's brigade, on the night of the twenty-ninth. Halting to give his men a few hours repose, he ordered Colonel Owens, with the Third Virginia cavalry to throw himself in front of the enemy, while the rest of the brigade attacked his right flank at the Wilderness tavern betwee Chancellorsville, General Stuart marched by Todd's tavern towards Spottsylvania Courthouse to put himself in communication with the main body of the army, and Colonel Owens fell back upon General Anderson. The enemy in our front near Fredericksburg continued inactive, and it was now apparent that the main attack would be made u, extending on the right to the Mine road, and to the left in the direction of the Catharine furnace. Colonel Wickham, with the Fourth Virginia cavalry, and Colonel Owens' regiment, was stationed between the Mine road and the Rappahannock. The rest of the cavalry was upon our left flank. It was evident that a direct attack upo