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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.34 (search)
ughter became the Countess of Spinola, but on the death of the Count of Spinola, they removed to Rome, where the home of the venerable couple, Commodore and Mrs. Jefferson Page, became the Mecca of Americans who visited that city. For a score of years Commodore Page was blind, but retained the full possession of his mental facultiCommodore Page was blind, but retained the full possession of his mental faculties. Besides his service at sea, Commodore Page surveyed and made soundings for the old Fire Island Channel, New York harbor, and for some years was stationed at the Naval Observatory in Washington. A widow, a daughter (the Countess of Spinola), Professor Frederick Page, of Bryn Mawr, Pa., and Philip Page, of Buenos Ayres, SoCommodore Page surveyed and made soundings for the old Fire Island Channel, New York harbor, and for some years was stationed at the Naval Observatory in Washington. A widow, a daughter (the Countess of Spinola), Professor Frederick Page, of Bryn Mawr, Pa., and Philip Page, of Buenos Ayres, South America, sons, survive him. He also has many relatives who reside in this State. The Page homestead at Shelley is now occupied by his grand-nephew, Richard Page. The death of Captain Page recalls to the minds of those who knew him many thrilling incidents in connection with his life. As Mr. Virginius Newton was one of t