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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 4, 1863., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for E. A. Palfrey or search for E. A. Palfrey in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
received: Hon. J. P. Benjamin, Montgomery, Ala.: The Battalion Washington Artillery Volunteers for the war. Captain E. A. Palfrey and Mr. David Urquhart, of the battalion, will leave to-morrow for Montgomery; directed to report to the Secretar is accepted for the war. You are ordered to Lynchburg, Va. L. Pope Walker, Secretary of War. Upon the return of Captain Palfrey and Mr. Urquhart, with final orders for moving the command, and with the necessary requisitions to complete the arma And with such men as Eschleman, Richardson, Hero, Bayne, Dupuy, Kursheedt, McElroy, O'Brien, Fuqua, De Russey, Holmes, Palfrey, Leverich, and our whole host of veterans, the command will not lack backers and advisors for the future. And in the woral Doubleday's Gettysburg, though it is far behind the best numbers of the series. Mr. Rope's Army under Pope, and General Palfrey's Antietam, for instance. It is mainly a narrative of the Federal operations in the Valley in 1864, only describing
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketches of the history of the Washington Artillery. (search)
exact character of the command, whether it was mounted or horse artillery, the following final dispatch was sent and answer received: Hon. J. P. Benjamin, Montgomery, Ala.: The Battalion Washington Artillery Volunteers for the war. Captain E. A. Palfrey and Mr. David Urquhart, of the battalion, will leave to-morrow for Montgomery; directed to report to the Secretary of War for orders. J. B. Walton, Major Commanding. Answer. war Department, Montgomery, Ala., May 13, 1861. Major J. B. Walton, New Orleans: Your battalion of artillery is accepted for the war. You are ordered to Lynchburg, Va. L. Pope Walker, Secretary of War. Upon the return of Captain Palfrey and Mr. Urquhart, with final orders for moving the command, and with the necessary requisitions to complete the armament, for transportation, etc., extraordinary exertions were made to get away to Virginia at the earliest possible moment. The citizens, the ladies especially, came grandly forward and liber
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Washington Artillery. (search)
tle; you see the father of the command, Colonel Walton, who has devoted a life to the service and welfare of the Washington Artillery. To whose tact, coolness and decision, the battalion owes much. His superior qualities as a commanding officer, and as a diplomat, have done much both in war and in peace to keep the battalion intact, and to preserve our esprit de corps. And with such men as Eschleman, Richardson, Hero, Bayne, Dupuy, Kursheedt, McElroy, O'Brien, Fuqua, De Russey, Holmes, Palfrey, Leverich, and our whole host of veterans, the command will not lack backers and advisors for the future. And in the words of Coleridge, when These good knights are dust, And their good swords are rust; Their souls with God, we trust, they will leave you a precious legacy, of which you should be proud. Preserve it carefully without blemish, for it is purified by the blood of brave men; and should your country need you in case of foreign war, stand manfully by your country's flag, and
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Shenandoah Valley in 1864, by George E. Pond—Campaigns of the civil war, XI. (search)
the civil war, XI. A Review, by Colonel Wm. Allan. This is one of the most interesting of the Scribner series and is valuable because of the clearness with which it is written, and of the amount of research it shows in bringing together information from widely scattered sources, concerning an exciting and important campaign. As history, too, it is far better than General Doubleday's Gettysburg, though it is far behind the best numbers of the series. Mr. Rope's Army under Pope, and General Palfrey's Antietam, for instance. It is mainly a narrative of the Federal operations in the Valley in 1864, only describing and discussing the Confederate side, so far as is necessary to the comprehension of the achievements of the Union armies. While, too, Mr. Pond's language is temperate, and he aims at fairness, his bias is very evident, and often converts his pages into a defence of, or panegyric upon the Federal commanders. He is not careful to state the strength of the forces engaged i